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Lorenzo

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #60 on: July 02, 2009, 11:06:38 AM »
Salud, Senor Bedo!

Yo estoy muy bien porque las examinas segundo estan fin. hehe. Por supuesto, para la gracia de Dios en Cielo, my compadres y yo tenemos un grado especial. hehehe. Pero de la gracia y sustancia de Dios den Cielo. hehehe. Gracias pos su comento, yo gusto visito la municipilidad de Valencia en la provincia de Bohol en la Republica Filipina, pero yo no se cuando porque yo tengo much much estudio en aqui...medicina segundo. Jaaa voy!

hehehe, pero gracias por sus inspiraciones!

En el nombre de Jesu Cristo!


Su Amigo,
Bran Lorenzo

Lorenzo

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #61 on: July 02, 2009, 11:08:44 AM »

I should want to visit Zamboanga in the future. hehe. Viva Chavacano!

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #62 on: July 02, 2009, 12:11:44 PM »
Yo no comprendo Espanol, porque yo no estudio in colegio.
Life is what you make.
Kon naa kay gisoksok, naa kay makuot.

http://feldarblogspotcom.blogspot.com/
http://darayagrifacts.blogspot.com/

Lorenzo

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #63 on: July 02, 2009, 12:14:06 PM »
Pero, senor, tu escribes en espanol perfecto. hehe.


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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #64 on: July 02, 2009, 11:52:48 PM »

Nice, nice, nice nga paghinumdum sa mga events ug pag-associate sa mga words. Tinuod jud na Raqz. In Baybay, Leyte ang "billion" or "bilyon" means "bu****", kanang magyawyaw siya rang usa, unya hangad langit, morag nag-ihap sa mga bituon. "Pagka bilyon baya anang tawhana", means "Pagka bu**** baya . . . "   

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #65 on: July 02, 2009, 11:55:41 PM »
My college professor in Spanish was surnamed Faelnar.  Kon amo siyang libakon, mag-conjugate dayon mi . . . Faelno, Faelnas, Faelna, Faelnamos, Faelnais, Faelnan.

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #66 on: July 02, 2009, 11:56:20 PM »
Did "Mampor" really exist?

Lorenzo

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #67 on: July 03, 2009, 12:27:18 AM »
There is no word in Spanish 'Mampor'

But one can see the idiom that was probably created. A localized diction, most probably.

Mam, the shortened form of Madam. And Por, for the word 'Por Favor' (please).

So if one uses the term, Mampor, to say a superior woman (superior in terms of age, position, and respective clause), then it would make sense.

One can see the idiom of 'en Bola' that is used in Spain, but the meaning makes no sense in Latin America. Word is the same, but the context it is used is foreign.

Localized diction.

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #68 on: July 03, 2009, 12:32:09 AM »
Sa mga sabungan, "pago" or "gi-pago" means one absconds or flees with all the money (bets), when in fact it means "I pay" from the word "pagar" (to pay). 

Lorenzo

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #69 on: July 03, 2009, 12:33:13 AM »
I'll give you a specific example.

The phrase, "Ja Voy" or 'Yo Voy'  is used as a declaratory statement. It means "I'm going. I go"

In Spain it is pronounced as (jzho vhoyy). But in Latin America, it would be pronounced as "Yo boy"

One can easily tell the difference from a native Spanish speaker from Spain and a native Spanish speaker from say Argentina, Mexico, Honduras, Peru, Boliva etc.
The Spaniards are light speakers, and carry a 'lisp' in how they speak Spanish. The tongue doesn't extrapolate too much of a strong sound. Emphasis is on the light tone, and speed. Latin American speakers are slower in how how they talk, and utilize a heavy emphasis on tone.

One can compare the American form of English to say, British English.

Lorenzo

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #70 on: July 03, 2009, 12:42:45 AM »

hehe, yes, its interesting to see the local diction appropriating its influence on the original Spanish Ar Verb "Pagar".

Instead of using yo pago, nosotros pagamos, ellos pagan, ellas pagan, ustedes pagan, ---the Filipinoized diction made it 'Gi Pago' hehehe.

====

One notices the meaning of obviously Spanish words have a total different meaning of the original. I'll give you an example.

The term 'Siempre' or 'Siempre Si' means "Always" in Spanish.
In sentence format it would be used as: En el barco de Magellan, los soldados del Rey Espana y comandante Fernando Magellan gustan a compenzan los islas de Malacas y Cathay por la economia de Imperio Hispanidad, Siempre Si."

In this context, the word "Siempre" means "Always."

But in Filipino context, the word 'Siempre' now has acquired a new meaning, which is "Of Course."

When a Filipino speaker asks his father if he wants him to cook food, the father would respond, "Siempre, na gutom na gud ko"
--
In this example, the term siempre has taken up the meaning of 'Of Course'.

--

Again, local diction. :)

Lorenzo

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #71 on: July 03, 2009, 03:25:31 AM »
I had a discussion with some of my Spanish friends about this some time ago, as they asked me whether if Spanish is still spoken in the Philippines, any influential presence. My answer was "Asi Asi"

Filipino language maintains its austronesian stock, but at the same time, borrows and adds in Spanish words, phrasing, and tensing and has assimilated the world to sound more Austronesian. 'Filipinoizing' it. hehe, even so much as to change the way the word is written to look and sound more 'native' hehe.

====

Some examples:

The word 'Cantar' = it means 'To Sing' in Spanish.
But in Filipino dialects, they have assimilated the world to the native usage.
ex) Hoy, dali na lagi diri, gi andar na ang mic, kai gusto mi mo kanta-kanta.
--In this case 'kanta-kanta' is the assiimilated format of cantar.

Ex) Dali na ba, tokar-a tong kanta sa ganina.
--In this case the term 'tokar-a' is the localized form of 'Tocar' , which means "To play".

So many more examples! hehehe
-----

What is rather interesting for me to read and observe is how some words that are clearly very Latin, the Filipino people have changed the way it is written, adding suffixes to make it more 'Pinoy' sounding. hehehehe

Examples lang:

Guapa = Spanish Form
Gwapang/ Gwapa kaayo = Pinoy Form

Guapo = Spanish Form
Gwapo/ Gwapo kaayo = Pinoy Form

Situacion = Spanish Form
Sityuwasyon = Pinoy Form

Ebajada = Spanish Form
Embahada = Pinoy Form

Republica = Spanish Form
Republika = Pinoy Form

Parientes = Spanish Form
Paryentes/ Paryente nako = Spanish Form

Educacion = Spanish Form
Edyukasyon = Pinoy Form


hehehe

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #72 on: July 03, 2009, 11:18:36 PM »
Naa pay daghan kaayo ana Renz. There is a very comprehensive book entitled "Diccionario de Español en la Lengua Tagala" that presents how Spanish words have been assimilated into the local language or evolved from its original meaning. Like ante para de ojos - nahimong "antyohos" or "antipara"; la mesa - lamesa; como esta - kumusta, etc.

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #73 on: July 04, 2009, 12:00:22 AM »
kanang word na donsilya, spanish ba na?
No more monkey business!

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #74 on: July 04, 2009, 12:49:23 AM »

That is an interesting book, I'd like to get my hands on a copy of that, actually. Its really interesting how language has developed over the centuries and how Latin words have been entrenched into the Filipino diction.

The most obvious is the numerical system in use. Spanish numerical system still are in place, albeit the fact that the spelling has changed to meet the Filipino tongue.
Even in Latin America, there are parts of Mexico, Honduras and Guatemala that still retain their old Aztec and Toltec indigenous phrasing while using Spanish as the prefix or the suffix.

For example the Aztec word of "Choltepixactl" It was a name of an old city, but after the Spaniards conquored the region, it was Hispanized to "Churpatara Tiera" hehe :)

The reason why the Philippines retained a higher semblance of its austronesian wording was the fact that there wasn't that much of a Spanish overseas migration to the Philippines, as compared to the level of human migration from Spain to say the Viceroyalidad de Nueva Espana y La Plata y Peru. The Spaniards brought with them not only their tongue, but their bodies. It was Spanish policy to intermingle, and breed with the local peoples---a way to Hispanize the Native Ameri-Indians in Central and South America. As a result, for the most part, the populations of Latin America are now a mestizo mix. With most peoples having some kind of European Blood---obviously Spanish blood.

The Philippines, on the other hand, was spared from the massive Hispanic human migration due to its logistical distance. It simply was too far away for Spanish migrants. That and the fact that the Philippines---back in the 16th to 19th centuries was not considered a Provincial Colony. On the contrary, it was, by provision of the Imperial Audencia y Ecclastisticum, a Royal Spanish Bastion. It was a military colony. It was governed by a Military Provisional Government, that was part of the Viceroyalidad de Nueva Espana (Present day Mexico, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Honduras etc). The Philippines remained a military colony from 1565 till 1840, until the loss of Spain's American colonies. When the Philippines became developed--in the mid 19th century--only then was there a significant Spanish migration to the archipelago. And even then, it was mostly Spanish Military as well as the poor Spanish gentry that arrived to the Philippines. Many of whom mixed and bred with the local indigenous population.

The Philippines---was not the focal point of a human economic migration because i didn't have the fertile land to support an expansive population. As we remember that prior to Hispanization of the islands, the population of the archipelago was no more than 100.000- 200.000. As documented by the exploratory monks (Augustinian/ Dominitians). The Philippines, was actually a religious experiment for the Spanish, observing the animistic and pagan society of the archipelago, the Spaniards conquored the islands in the goal to Christianize the people, to bring the Word of God to the people. Government and infrastructure---came with the Spaniards. They brought with them Roman jurisprudence, the concept of the bario (pueblo), municipalidad, provincia, cuidad, regionalidad, colonidad. Brought with them the concept of education--prison systems, and the very core factor that led to teh success of the Philippine Colony.----THE Spanish Eoncomienda System. Or in Filipino term---it is called the Hacienda and the Hacienderos. It was the Encomienda---the concept of a landowning and farming community that transformed the archipelago. Figuratively and Literally.

With the structured base of the hacienda, which was established throughout the archipelago by the premis and prediliction of the Catholic Church--and by the Conquistadores, it established Rice as the farming crop. Development of othe agriraian goods such as maize, potatoes, sugar cane, pineapple, mango, hemp, logging trees etc. This rise of commerce and food product was the precipitating factor that led to the boom of the Local Native population. From 1560--the population of the islands was documented to no more than 100.000-2oo.ooo. By the late 19th century, Las Filipinas had a population that has reached 8 MILLION!

From province to province, there was organization, there was a presence of law, societal forums, as well as the foundation for a nation-state, which would facilitate the entual revolutionary aspirations of the people---after reachign societal evolution from a pseudo-barbaric argrarian society prior to Hispanization to a society that reached the pinnacle of Hispano-Romanization within a span of 3 centuries.


So, obviously---with the heavy Hispanization of the Archipelago, and since its success was due to Spanish visage, it is only obviously evident that language would be also influenced by the Hispanization that occured, naturally.


Am I surprised? No. It makes sense.
Culturally, linguistically, societally and economically.

hehe

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #75 on: July 04, 2009, 12:59:22 AM »

The honorrific title of 'Don' means "Sir, Lord, Sire" albeit it is in masculine form.
The honorrific title for a woman of the Peninsulare-Class (the aristocratic ruling class) would be "Dona, Dona Senora"

Donsillo or Donsilla would be used as a respective gesture.
A term that a working member of the gentry-class would use to refer to---the Gobernadorcillo and his wife or any member in the Peninsulare-Class.

The term "Donsillo/ Donsilla" illustrates how classed society was in the Spanish Epoch.
The same for any European Society in that time period. We see the same in Spain, as well.

Donsillo ---would be used to refer to the Lord Governor, or Lord Mayor.

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #76 on: July 04, 2009, 01:41:11 AM »
But here in the Philippines, if a girl is "donselya", it means that she is a virgin, intact. Donselya here is strictly feminine. There is no donselyo to mean a virgin male.

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #77 on: July 04, 2009, 06:30:57 AM »
Donselya is of course from the Spanish word "doncella" which means, historically and literarily, maiden, but it also means maidservant and well, yes, virgin. It may be noted that Schubert's "Der Tod und das Madchen" is usually rendered into English as "Death and the Maiden" but into Spanish as "La Muerte y la Doncella".
...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #78 on: July 04, 2009, 06:40:03 AM »
I haven't encountered the word "doncello" that refers to a male virgin. It would appear that the concept of the male virgin is nonexistent in the psyche of peoples who language is characterized by the use of the subjunctive mood.  ;)

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Re: Which Is The Crazy Language? Let's Translate.
« Reply #79 on: July 04, 2009, 10:43:21 AM »

Taym sa, klaroha kuno ni Doy Lorenzo. Naa ba goy honorific title nga Donsillo/Donsilla? Which part of the Spanish-speaking world man ni gigamit, and which epoch? Taronga kuno ning imong mga post kay naa baja tingali motuo nimo.



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