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Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« on: February 11, 2011, 03:45:38 PM »
It was really frustrating, for me, as a Filipino that he killed himself just like that. i think it was an easy way out for him, so frustrating, because the truth didnt come up. and what about the high hierarchy of the corrupt people behind of Mr. Reyes? will just laugh out loud kasi abswelto na naman sila? God Bless, Philippines!

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #1 on: February 11, 2011, 06:47:30 PM »
here is from my emailbox. There are still sectors who believe that good and justice will prevail;

        Below are two articles. One by Heidi Mendoza and the other by Maria Ressa. The first is a request that I believe most of us can do until something more is required.

        The other is a speech of Maria Ressa which is something we all should consider in our own personal situation.

 

 

            Greetings of Peace! In the middle of the raging controversies that our country is facing, one glaring truth cannot simply be ignored. There is a brewing tension between good and evil and I believe now is the time to for a baptized Catholic and a Christian public servant like me to run to my mentors and seek the comfort of the church.

            As many of you would know, I accepted the General Garcia case not as another audit engagement sometime in October 2004. It was a result of prayerful discernment and a series of consultation with guardians of my faith. I went beyond the call of duty and closed my eyes to my personal fears, guided by the thought that my heart is in the right place.

            The assignment just like any Christian experience is not smooth sailing. There are challenges coming from the very institutions that are supposed to protect the interest of the people. I stood firm though I cannot deny that there were several instances when convictions and beliefs simply failed to sustain me. As history will tell, then, Ombudsman Marcelo resigned, I was left to seek help from my own office the Commission on Audit. The response is again a challenge to ordinary faith. No less than the former Chair convinced me to simply return the documents my team gathered and close the case. "Christ himself failed to save the world so how can ordinary mortals like us dream of succeeding in the fight against corruption when obviously it is a fight between good and evil."

            Perhaps I am not willing to give up my flickering hope and diminishing faith inside that I just decided to quit from a 20 year old job. In March 16, 2006, on the birth of my father who has painstakingly shown me the values of honest and dedicated public service, I filed my resignation.

            In October 2007, the state prosecutors handling the case, begged me to help the government and with minor convincing, I agreed. I appeared at Sandiganbayan for more than 16 times and in between those hearing, I felt the absence of the public support which I think is critical to cases such as this. In one instance, in open court hearing, I was astounded when the defense lawyer slapped before my face the copy of the letter of the CoA chair denying the creation of an audit team that took care of the investigation. It's the biggest test to my faith. No less than the accused told me that I am a liar and that there will be a reckoning day for me"

            It is in this particular time that I sought for a God with His mighty arm that will simply strike the opponents of truth with his blazing sword. At the same time, I sought for the wounded and agonizing face of my savior so I can draw some strength and the passion to go on. I felt so alone that prayers alone are not sufficient to console me, I was then literally reaching to a God whom I can hold, I can touch, I can embrace! He did not deprive me of this longing, when you texted me on that date, I realized that God has gone high tech and invaded the virtual world.

            I thought that the challenge was ended, the moment I completed my appearances before the Sandiganbayan. I was wrong. Last March 12, 2010 I personally saw the signed plea bargain agreement but I must admit that I have been weakened by my own experience and already afraid to give up the comfortable life that I have.

            Still however, I searched my conscience and shared these with few trusted friends. As a consequence of my fear, we now have a seeming triumph of evil versus the truth.

            Last December 23, 2010, I filed my resignation from my current employer in response to a conscience call. It is my Christian calling that I cannot ignore that is why I went out of my comfort zone and together with my entire family heed the call to embrace this cause with the same passion when I started it.

            I seek your assistance, I am reaching out for help in making a united stand. Sinners as we are, I am confident that God will bless the pure longing of our broken heart if we are willing to make a sacrifice.

            The government that we have right now is certainly not perfect, but I think it is the only Government that we have and the government that we deserve. The plea bargain happened during the dark years of the previous administration.  Together we need to inform our people, we need to make a united stand.

            

            In ending, let me express my gratitude to the only people I looked up with so much faith and respect. The recent events have shown me that the truth is unveiled not in the brilliant minds of men but only in the hearts of men burning with Love and Faith.

            I would like to apologize, if there are any courtesies which I have not observed. I am asking for prayers not only for my family but for the entire country.

            Marami pong salamat!

            Heidi Mendoza

            

            

           


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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #2 on: February 11, 2011, 07:02:20 PM »
 "How Good People Turn Evil"

            by Maria Ressa | January 31, 2011

             

            Last week's expose by Lt. Col. George Rabusa ripped open a Pandora's box of corruption that implicated three former military chiefs-of-staff. He is expected to reveal more including implicating former Philippine President Gloria Macapagal Arroyo.

            The reason Rabuza can expose it is because he was part of it. Many more people allowed this corruption to happen in plain sight and continue to help spread it by staying quiet. By choosing to expose this endemic corruption, Rabuza shows he's a good man, but how can he have been part of this system for so long? How can good people turn evil?

            How can good people turn evil? I attempt some answers. On Wednesday, Jan. 5, 2011, multinational company MSD asked me to keynote their national conference - a group of about 500 people, 400 of them in sales. They asked me to address ongoing corruption between medical representatives and doctors - as insidious a problem as corruption in media. The fact that MSD made it a principle to fight it and are telling their med reps to veer away from it was something I wanted to be part of. This was the speech I gave.

            The Courage to Do What's Right

            Thank you for inviting me to speak to you tonight. When Marco called me, I was with my family - my parents from Florida, my sister from LA, another sister who moved to Manila from NY. We were just getting off a plane - the first real break we'd had together in six years. Because of the timing of the request, I would've said no to anything else but it's very hard to say no to this topic - how to be successful AND be true to your values and ethics. Thank you to each of you - and to the management of MSD - for caring about it Å  and for asking me to put my thoughts together for you tonight.

            I KNOW you can do both, but it's not easy to be both successful and ethical in our country today. Corruption is endemic. It infiltrates so many aspects of our lives. Influence-peddling is the name of the game. Conflicts of interest are all over the place. I found many Filipino organizations have a difficult time even defining what conflict of interest means. It's too easy to rationalize particularly when it means more money or influence.

            Sometimes doing the wrong thing seems to be the only way to get ahead. I've heard so many Filipinos say that - particularly the street-savvy operators who are trying to get you to do the wrong thing!

            You have to find the courage to say no. You have to do what's right - not just for your company, but for yourself. You have to find and set this line - a line you promise yourself you will never cross - because crossing that line means you're turning from good to evil. It's that simple. And you must make it that simple.

            Why? This insight came from a dinner I had Tuesday night with an accomplished, incredible group of five women, fellow awardees for the TOWNS - Ten Outstanding Women in the Nation's Service. All 5 are doctors - two medical doctors, three PhDs. Everyone at the table was a teacher, and everyone had chosen to leave a western nation - from the US, London, Australia - in order to come back - to come home to the Philippines.

            This group tries to get together at least once a year to support each other in our work, and to give each other feedback from our different fields. Our topic Tuesday was corruption and how we choose to fight it in our society. One woman said she was tired and needed to pull back. Another talked about how people who try to do the right thing seem to have to work so hard and get paid so little. Still a third said she was surprised at how good people can turn so evil - how people she knew from college are now so corrupt, and yet they don't seem to understand nor feel that they are doing anything wrong!

            That was the insight: corrupt people don't think they're corrupt. Just like evil people don't think they're evil. Because getting there starts with one small step across a line.

            Once you take that first step and cross over, the succeeding steps become easier, and before you know it, you're not just corrupt but are now corrupting others. This, for me, is like a reverse tipping point. You know the book by Malcolm Gladwell? The subtitle to the Tipping Point is How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference. The idea is that it's the little steps that begin the change that simmers beneath the surface until the system hits critical mass, the boiling point.

            When did we become endemically corrupt as a nation? The point when enough people took enough small steps to make it that way.

            We have to change it. How do we do that? By understanding how we got there. It starts with each person making a choice. Draw the line in the sand. Do not cross it.

            The most dangerous decision is that first one - when you move from being perfectly clean and idealistic Å  to being tempted Å  to wanting itÅ  and then accepting it. Don't do it. Once you do, it's a slippery slope. Define that line and DO NOT CROSS it. If you've already done it, pay special attention to the four step program at the end, ok?

            As a journalist, media corruption is a fact of life. Politicians, company officers and government officials have said they're flabbergasted by the number of journalists on their payrolls. I ask, "why don't you stop paying and expose them?" They say they can't because they're afraid if they don't pay, they would be attacked. It's so prevalent the radio guys coined a term for it - "AC-DC" - Attack-Collect-Defend-Collect.

            Of course, paying also works in favor of the newsmakers: if they pay, they control what's written or said about them. They know when it will come out, and what type of exposure and PR they can get. That certainty, for them, is worth paying journalists. So the cycle feeds itself.

            Young journalists say no because they're idealistic, but after a while, they start to see the way things really work. They begin to get disillusioned. The lines begin to blur together, particularly since so many of their elders are doing it.

            Then the real test comes - the offer that's hard to refuse. Everyone gets that. If you pass that test, chances are you'll stay clean your whole professional career. It's a tipping point in a positive way. You've already said no to the hardest offer to decline - the one you wanted the most - so everything is easy. But the tipping point works the other way if you accept.

            It starts with envelopes of money in press conferences. When I was with Probe, I thought, let's make it easier for the newsmakers and publicly state our position against what we called envelopmental journalism. So we did.

            Strangely, other journalists - our colleagues - were critical of us for raining on their parade. During that time, it seemed to me that the clean journalists were the ones who were ostracized and cowed into silence. They didn't trumpet their beliefs because they were afraid others would say they're "nagmamalinis" - even if that really was what we should be doing. Our cultural values somehow doesn't extend to making others ashamed to be corrupt. A friend explained it to me this way: "I have no right to take that money away from his kids."

            There are some simple truths. The more you say no, the easier it becomes. The more you do the right thing, the harder it is to do the wrong thing. It's a tipping point approach to building your identity.

            My line in the sand was defined long ago. The tipping point happened in the mid-90's - when the fiancée of one of my closest friends offered me $150,000 to do a story for CNN. It wouldn't be traceable, he told me, and it would be deposited directly into my bank account. He gave the offer over lunch, and although I wanted to say no immediately, he held my hand and said, please take at least a night to sleep on it and think about it. I did.

            I was shocked. I didn't even tell my friend. That night, I thought about it. But then reality stepped in. My sense of self is tied to being a professional journalist, and I couldn't look at myself in the mirror if I accepted the bribe.

            I had drawn the line clearly, and I knew that accepting that money would make me a fundamentally different person. On this side of the line, I'm good. On the other side, I'm evil. It's that simple.

            How do I define evil? I like the definition from a book I'd encourage everyone to read: THE LUCIFER EFFECT: HOW GOOD PEOPLE TURN EVIL by Philip Zimbardo. He did the famous Stanford Prison Experiment - when he took a group of ordinary students and put them in a mock prison, randomly assigning some as guards, others as prisoners. In less than a week, he had to stop the study when the `guards' became increasingly sadistic and the `prisoners' pathological. He analyzes these findings in the context of what American soldiers did in Abu Ghraib and Guantanamo Bay prisons.

            It shows how situations - culture if you will - can make good people do bad things because they conform, comply, obey or are seduced by the circumstances. They join the group. They justify. They rationalize.

            These findings helped explain many things about Philippine society to me - endemic corruption and election violence, particularly heinous crimes like the Maguindanao massacre.

            Zimbardo gives evil a psychologically based definition: "Evil consists in intentionally behaving in ways that harm, abuse, demean, dehumanize, or destroy innocent others - or using one's authority and systemic power to encourage or permit others to do so on your behalf."

            The second part is as important as the first part because it means that you can't turn away and pretend you don't see evil done when you have the ability to stop it. It's a culture we need to create.

            How do you do that? Let me jump a little here because it reminds me of the Princeton Honor Code, which each Princetonian writes on every single term paper, every single exam: one single sentence that says you have not cheated and - this is important - you promise to turn in anyone who does.

            Teachers leave the students alone in a room, hand out test papers, and put them on their honor. It's brilliant in part because it uses peer pressure. Even if you tried to cheat, can you be sure everyone in the room will cheat with you by not turning you in? Even worse, are you willing to compromise not just your honor but everyone else's? You're part of a tradition that dates back hundreds of years, and you can't let the institution, your friends, and your family down. It was always with a sense of pride and great honor that I signed that pledge.

            In my six years as head of news, I tried to bring that culture in - to use peer pressure to redefine up rather than down - to live according to our ideals. So we wrote a Standards & Ethics Manual.

            We took a zero tolerance approach to corruption. No matter who you are, if you accept a bribe, you will lose your job. Instead of accepting offers, our people started reporting them. We proved peer pressure can also work in a good way!

            I discovered a lot more than I bargained for. One employee reported an offer for about P12 million for a series of stories on one issue. It uncovered a systematic attempt to influence policy through news reports. Once you become aware, you can pick these stories in our major papers.

            Elections were another matter. In Nov 2009 - months before the May 2010 elections, several people at our desk reported political candidates who offered sizeable monthly atm deposits in exchange for stories. We met with the candidates who made those offers and told them that if they didn't stop, we would do stories about their bribery attempts. We would start a series called corruption watch. I told them they didn't need to pay for stories.

            Several of the candidates candidly said you know if we didn't do this, other journalists would be upset and write against us. "We're only protecting ourselves," they said. One talked about having to run a covert media campaign and asked for help finding someone who could run black ops. We gave them a grace period to stop and said we would run stories exposing these practices.

            So let's go back to Zimbardo's definition of evil. He summarized all of this in one sentence: he said evil is "knowing better but doing worse."

            Knowing better but doing worse.

            What does that mean for you? I'm told most of you are med reps - what MSD calls Professional Healthcare Representatives. Two questions for you to think about. What is your relationship to the doctors you deal with? What role do you play in giving quality healthcare to Filipinos?

            At dinner Tuesday, the two TOWNS doctors were very vocal about this controversial relationship between the pharmaceutical industry and the medical profession. They talked about how doctors accept free trips, junkets, expensive gifts and favors.

            They said doctors rationalize: "Everyone is doing it." "I'd be stupid if I didn't take it." "The budget is there anyway." I like this one -"I don't have to do what they want anyway." I've heard the same excuses from journalists who accept bribes - and encourage others to do the same. It's like a virus that spreads.

            Corruption cuts across our industries. This is a challenge for all of us. You know your reality better than I do. You have your business targets. So the question only you can answer is - what are you willing to do to get what you want? Where do you draw the line you will never cross? Where on this side you're good, on the other, you're evil?

            How do you define your own individual battle for integrity?

            The tipping point starts with each of us as people. Then it goes to your company. Merck's values include these statements: "We are committed to the highest standards of ethics and integrity. We are responsible to our customers, to Merck employees and their families, to the environments we inhabit, and to the societies we serve worldwide. In discharging our responsibilities, we do not take professional or ethical shortcuts. Our interactions with all segments of society must be transparent and reflect the high standards we profess."

            Fantastic. A question for all of you: does MSD live up to its stated values? If you do, how do you fight against those who take shortcuts, who are unethical, who do evil?

            Let me end with four ideas that have helped me find the courage to do what's right:

            1. Be excellent at what you do. Work hard. Everything begins there.

            2. Be self-aware. Ask yourself the tough questions and give honest answers. Be aware of how your actions affect others.

            3. Take responsibility for what you say and what you do. Will you act this way if everyone can see what you're doing? Statements like "only following orders" or "everyone else was doing it" abdicates responsibility. Remember, how you behave is completely under your control.

            4. Find your allies. Once you find the courage to say no and take responsibility for your actions, you reverse the tipping point for evil and begin to tilt the balance the other way. Fight the group that will drag you down. Find the group that will raise you up. You'll need help.

            I wish you stamina and much courage for the battles ahead. If each of you decides to draw the line, you make a choice for good. It will make a difference for you, your family and your company. But it goes further - and gets much bigger - than that. When you put all our efforts together, we can push the tipping point for our nation.

            Thank you.

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2011, 09:45:49 PM »
I hope something good will prevail  ???
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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #4 on: February 12, 2011, 04:45:49 AM »
  In my honest opinion, NO. Had he die because he expose the corruption in the military? YES.


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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #5 on: February 12, 2011, 08:45:23 PM »
Ultimately, the question is whether or not self-immolation is honorable, for whatever reason. Anyhow, the issue being more cultural than philosophical, it would appear that Reyes's suicide was more dishonorable than otherwise. I have always argued (disagreeing with a good number of top honchos) that the iconic suicide of Admiral Boorda was dishonorable; with more at stake, the case at bar is even more so.
...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #6 on: February 13, 2011, 05:38:23 PM »
is their honor in being corrupt? ....... NO

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #7 on: February 13, 2011, 08:46:12 PM »
i look at it as his own graceful exit.  whether it was honorable or not was between him and his god.  it behooves on the rest of us to respect his memory.
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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #8 on: February 13, 2011, 09:06:54 PM »

Speaking of grace, well, with all the pressure he felt, doing away with himself clearly was a courageous thing to do--courage being a double-edged virtue.

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #9 on: February 14, 2011, 12:04:34 PM »
Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably? Yes, because he is sinless in the eyes of God. Before his death, he repented his sins and ask forgiveness at the tomb of his mother. Quote for the Bible, 1 John 1:9,"
 If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us our sins, and to cleanse us from all unrighteousness."

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #10 on: February 14, 2011, 12:22:24 PM »
The question of honor is, sad to say, a concern among humans and about humans in relation to one another.

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #11 on: February 14, 2011, 12:31:03 PM »

He should not have committed suicide and taken the coward's way out. Instead, should have taken problems of life head on. These problems were lessons that God was sending him to teach him a lesson for his corrupt ways. Instead of learning, he tried to escape it--in this life.

Suicide, in Roman Catholic Teaching, is a great sin.

May God be merciful to his eternal soul.


Chongki

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #12 on: February 14, 2011, 02:53:18 PM »
www.inquirer.net


Theres The Rub
Corruption kills


By Conrado de Quiros
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 04:55:00 02/14/2011

Filed Under: Graft & Corruption, Military, Angelo Reyes, Civil & Public Services, Suicide


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Close this FIRST OFF, let’s get a couple of things straight.

One is that George Rabusa and Heidi Mendoza, whose revelations sent Angelo Reyes’ life into a tailspin, have nothing to be ashamed of, embarrassed about, or regret. Sonny Trillanes, Jinggoy Estrada and the other senators who hounded Angelo Reyes have no reason to think they should have spared Reyes the public humiliation or taken a more lenient view of his part in the AFP’s shady doings.

Of course Reyes’ family is distraught—who wouldn’t be, losing a loved one in that way—one has to respect that. But that is no reason to be blind to reason, or to throw away all perspective. Rabusa and Mendoza have everything to be proud of, what they did was courageous, Mendoza in particular who had everything to lose but did what she did anyway. Trillanes and Estrada have every reason to hold their heads high, whatever their motives for exposing Reyes, whether they came from a lofty desire to pursue the truth, as their supporters say, or from a base need to exact revenge, as their detractors accuse them of.

Two is that Reyes is not a hero. Self-destruction is not a natural claim to heroism, it is merely a claim to a shred of dignity. It may not be rewarded with honors, it may merely be accorded acknowledgment. Indeed, you go by the principle that flight is an admission of guilt, then you must at least suspect, if not find, Reyes guilty as charged. There is no more resolute form of flight than the permanent one he took.

I agree that Reyes was not the worst of the lot—other AFP chiefs of staff, the ones in particular who showed canine loyalty to Arroyo, got more. I agree that he was not “greedy”—by the established, and crooked, canons of institutionalized theft in the AFP. I agree that he did not take more than his “due” as AFP head—he was little-league compared not just to his military counterparts during Arroyo’s time but to his civilian ones. That did not make him less prosecutable, that just made the others more so.

I don’t know why we accept as commonsensical the proposition that if others are doing what you’re doing, even if it’s wrong, then it must be right. That was of course the argument behind the bishops’ justification of “Hello Garci”: “Everybody cheats anyway.” Well, if true, then the conclusion may not be: “OK, let’s let her off the hook.” The conclusion may only be: “Then let’s jail all the others.” That Reyes was not “greedy” does not let him off the hook, it just clamps the hook more firmly on the others who were. Or it ought to.

Death is an entitlement only to respect, not to revising history or turning the world upside down, making wrong right and right wrong. Suicide is an entitlement only to grudging deference, not to open admiration and a place in Valhalla, or its equivalent in the Libingan ng mga Bayani, however the Libingan ng mga Bayani is home to a host of scoundrels anyway.

But having said that, I do acknowledge that Reyes has contributed epically, if unwittingly, to changing the landscape in the fight against corruption by his act of self-destruction. I suspect it will have a profound impact on the thinking of this country on it.

I do not mean by this that public officials will suddenly, or even gradually, be persuaded to be less venal or less inclined to satisfy their appetites. What Reyes’ act will probably do is just make them more careful. Certainly, I do not mean by this that public officials will suddenly, or even gradually, be persuaded to rid the world of themselves when they find themselves in the throes of disgrace. I doubt you will find the former First Couple entertaining thoughts of a mutually self-inflicted St. Valentine’s Day massacre just because they are seen as no better than the Marcoses. Or Imelda herself.

But even if it merely made public officials less brazen, less barefaced, less in-your-face about their pillage, Reyes’ act will already have amounted to something. If it made public officials more circumspect, more careful, more ashamed to be found out, Reyes’ act will already have done quite a trick. The culture of impunity during Arroyo’s time did not merely blanket mayhem, it blanketed pillage. It wasn’t just murderers who plied their trade in broad daylight, it was highway robbers in gowns and barong Tagalog too. Reyes’ act brings back reprehensibility to what they do.

That is huge, bringing back reprehensibility to what they do. That is where I see the more lasting effect of Reyes’ act—in changing the public’s attitude toward corruption, in changing the public’s tolerance of corruption, in changing the public’s acceptance of corruption as “nothing new.”

What Reyes has done is to make the public realize that corruption kills: It kills the foot soldier who is deprived of his means of survival; it kills the child who is deprived of his means of education. What Reyes has done is make corruption something to be deeply ashamed of, something you apologize to your mother about for suggesting to the world she raised a son or daughter not worthy of her name. What Reyes has done is to make corruption carry with it the most lethal consequences, making us tell our corrupt officials: If you cannot end your life, we will help you do the next best thing, which is to spend life in Munti or Bilibid.

Reyes’ act may not have a tremendous impact on the conduct of public officials, but it will have a tremendous impact on the thinking of the public—which in the end will have a tremendous impact on the conduct of public officials. The only time we’ll really see corruption go is when we start telling our crooks, past and present: “Mahiya-hiya ka naman, bakit hindi ka pa nagpapakamatay?”

Reyes has done us the supreme favor of raising that question from the dead, like Lazarus.

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #13 on: February 14, 2011, 04:33:09 PM »

Forgive me my lack of faith, but if Reyes' act "made public officials more circumspect, more careful, more ashamed to be found out", it's going to be only for a short while. Then the old system of values will begin creeping back, perhaps even more venal this time--what with a body politic cursed with apathy and a deeply-ingrained habit of forgetting.  

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #14 on: February 14, 2011, 07:11:17 PM »

Forgive me my lack of faith, but if Reyes' act "made public officials more circumspect, more careful, more ashamed to be found out", it's going to be only for a short while


I subscribe to this. The pressure must be too much, but our actions have their consequences and this is one.


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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #15 on: February 14, 2011, 11:15:13 PM »
Its quite shameful to think that in a supposed Catholic country, the level of corruption is so rampant. These officials who now feel the guilt of their actions after this man's suicide is not an excuse for their actions, nor does it exempt them from their dereliction of duty and abuse.

As for Reyes, the pressure of political ravelings should not have been a reason for his suicide. Former President Estrada never took his life even after his disgraceful loss of Presidential Power by People's Power a decade ago. The same goes for Former President Ferdinand Marcos, who himself was disgraced from political power.

It is a shame that he took his life, and his taking of his life does not pardon him of his abuse of power, nor does it give his name greater light. His apparent suicide is the very epitome of a coward.

I am sorry Mr. Reyes, but you cannot escape The Final Judge and His Judgment..where you are going. You may have evaded Philippine Justice, but you cannot hide from Providence now.

Suicide is an unpardonable Sin. His soul is now burning in eternal fires of hell.


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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #16 on: February 15, 2011, 06:18:18 AM »
Suicide is an unpardonable Sin. His soul is now burning in eternal fires of hell. [/color]

Kaluoy diay ni Angie kon maohon...  :'(

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #17 on: February 15, 2011, 08:48:49 AM »
Suicide is an unpardonable Sin. His soul is now burning in eternal fires of hell. [/color]


I need a quotation where this teaching comes from my dear Catholic defender... I must have missed the class that taught this  :P

Teaching from the Catechism of Catholic Church would do...



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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #18 on: February 15, 2011, 10:14:25 AM »
diba ang high points of the Catechism on its teachings on suicide are as follows:

#1 "Everyone is responsible for his life before God who has given it to him. It is God who remains the sovereign Master of life. We are obliged to accept life gratefully and preserve it for his honor and the salvation of our souls. We are stewards, not owners, of the life God has entrusted to us. It is not ours to dispose of."

# 2 "Suicide contradicts the natural inclination of the human being to preserve and perpetuate his life. It is gravely contrary to the just love of self. It likewise offends love of neighbor because it unjustly breaks the ties of solidarity with family, nation, and other human societies to which we continue to have obligations. Suicide is contrary to love for the living God."

#3  "If suicide is committed with the intention of setting an example, especially to the young, it also takes on the gravity of scandal."

#4  "Voluntary co-operation in suicide is contrary to the moral law."



Reference:
Catechism of the Roman Catholic Church

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Re: Do you think late Angelo Reyes died honorably?
« Reply #19 on: February 15, 2011, 10:20:46 AM »
The authoritative Catechism of the Catholic Church (paragraphs 2280-2283) makes the following points about suicide:

"Everyone is responsible for his life before God who has given it to him. It is God who remains the sovereign Master of life. We are obliged to accept life gratefully and preserve it for his honor and the salvation of our souls. We are stewards, not owners, of the life God has entrusted to us. It is not ours to dispose of."

"Suicide contradicts the natural inclination of the human being to preserve and perpetuate his life. It is gravely contrary to the just love of self. It likewise offends love of neighbor because it unjustly breaks the ties of solidarity with family, nation, and other human societies to which we continue to have obligations. Suicide is contrary to love for the living God."

"If suicide is committed with the intention of setting an example, especially to the young, it also takes on the gravity of scandal."

"Voluntary co-operation in suicide is contrary to the moral law."

"Grave psychological disturbances, anguish, or grave fear of hardship, suffering, or torture can diminish the responsibility of the one committing suicide."

"We should not despair of the eternal salvation of persons who have taken their own lives. By ways known to him alone, God can provide the opportunity for salutary repentance. The Church prays for persons who have taken their own lives."


http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/14326b.htm




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