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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #80 on: August 07, 2008, 09:09:39 PM »

Sa akong pangagpas chickboy ni si Dr. Josh sa bata-on pa. Kay balak-non man. Akong nabasahan nga sa pag eskwelan niya sa Santo Thomas(UST) ga board siya sa Intramuros. Naka uyab ni siya sa anak sa Tag-iya ilang boarding house. Mao to iyang First Love,kalimot ngan tong bayhana. Unya nibalhin siya sa Ateneo.

Sa akong tan-aw nga adto siya magduladula sa daplin sa Laguna lake. Naka-adto ko sa ilang balay sa Calamba atubang ra sa Simbahan. ug doul ra sa Laguna Lake. Kalingaw siguro nis Dr. Josh mamasul ug maglangoy-langoy sa lake.
Mid pleasures and palaces thought we may roam. Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home. - John H. Payneh

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #81 on: August 07, 2008, 09:13:42 PM »
si leonor rivera to iyang na uyab rald
I am not the center of my life but knowing the plan of GOD for me is....
binisaya nga bible study is available sa www.gcc.com.ph

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #82 on: August 07, 2008, 09:29:35 PM »
 of Rizal’s martyrdom."

The 1800s were tumultuous years for the Spanish monarchy. Napoleon had invaded the Iberian Peninsula earlier in the century taking the royal family into exile and installing a puppet on the throne. Revolution had racked her western hemisphere possessions, and Spain lost all of them, except Cuba and Puerto Rico, by the end of 1824. Then she lost Cuba and Puerto Rico in 1898. The economic life of Spain and her empire had been little changed by the industrial revolution. Intellectually, a sterility existed and did not change significantly until the Generation of 1898 writers and thinkers appeared.

Also, scandal tore at the very heart of the homeland when Generals Prim and Serrano removed Queen Isabel II from the throne for, among other things, gross immorality. They provided a military junta arrangement until the monarchy could be reestablished under more capable hands.

The 19th century produced volatility at home and abroad. Cuba experienced a ten-year civil war in the middle part of the century. Cuban expatriates as well as non-Cuban adventurers sought to wrest the island from the control of what they considered a fossilized monarchy and an absolutist church. Their efforts intensified in 1895 when José Martí returned to the island, losing his life but setting off a current of events which ultimately included an invasion by the United States and which resulted in Cuban independence. The Philippine Islands shared much in common with Cuba during the 19th century. It was in this environment that Jose Rizal made his appearance in 1861.

The Philippine hero was born to affluent parents in Calamba. He showed early academic promise and eventually obtained a licentiate in medicine specializing in ophthalmology. Few Masonic Lodges existed in the Philippines during Rizal’s adolescence, and Lodge membership consisted primarily of European Spaniards with only a sprinkling of Philippine nationals. Rizal’s uncle, Jose Alberto Alonzo, a Knight Commander of the Spanish Orders of Isabel the Catholic and Carlos III, had joined the Masonic Fraternity, possibly in Spain, certainly in Manila. Rizal lived in his uncle’s home during part of his student days. Whether his uncle exercised a Masonic influence on Rizal is not clear; what is certain is that Rizal acquired a lasting positive memory of Masonry which was enhanced when he visited Naples in 1882. There he saw a multitude of posters and signs announcing the death of the great Italian patriot Giuseppe Garibaldi, a 33° Scottish Rite Mason who had served as Grand Master. This impressed Rizal greatly for he wrote about this Masonic encounter in a letter to his family.

In Spain the young and highly impressionable Rizal encountered an intellectual environment with far fewer restraints than the one in his native land. Here he came under the influence of a host of outstanding thinkers, many of them Freemasons. For example, Grand Master Miguel Morayta helped to expand Rizal’s historical mind-set, and ex-President Francisco Pi y Margal exerted a profound influence on Rizal’s political evolution. Further, these republican liberals were staunch advocates of Philippine independence. Not surprisingly, Rizal petitioned Acacia Lodge No. 9, Gran Oriente de España, the very Lodge in which Morayta and Pi y Margal held membership. When initiated, Rizal selected Dimasalang as his symbolic name within the Craft, a custom prevalent at the time among Spanish Masons.

Rizal quickly became involved in Filipino expatriate circles in Spain and revealed a remarkable ability to write both poetry and prose. He soon commenced work on his famous novel Noli Me Tangere (Touch Me Not). In this seminal work, Rizal dissected the Philippine colonial government and placed particular blame for its repressive nature on certain religious elements. Rizal was convinced that conditions in the Philippines existed not because of Spain or the Catholic Church but because of the practices of certain regular clergy, namely Dominicans and Recollects. Spanish newspapers ran stories about the exciting Philippine firebrand, stories which soon made their way to Manila. There, government and religious authorities immediately took note and did not hesitate to label Rizal a subversive.

Bro. Rizal departed Spain in July 1885 to further his ophthalmology studies in France and Germany. For the next two years, he met and associated with the leading minds of Paris, Leipzig, Berlin, and Heidelberg. It was a heady atmosphere for the young Brother, and Masons in Germany, Dr. Rudolf Virchow and Dr. Feodor Jagor, were instrumental in his becoming a member of the Berlin Ethnological and Anthropological Societies. While in Germany, Rizal acquired additional Masonic Degrees.

When his novel Noli Me Tangere, came off the press in Europe, Rizal sent copies to, among others, the Governor-General of the Philippines and the Archbishop of Manila. The Governor-General, Emilio Terrero y Perinat, a 33° Mason, represented no problem, and he protected Rizal upon his return to the islands and for as long as he held the Governor-Generalship. The Archbishop, however, presented a problem which did not go away. Rizal had become increasingly convinced of his need to campaign in person for reform in the Philippines as opposed to propagandizing from afar. His friends cautioned him not to return but failed to dissuade the idealist. On August 5, 1887, Dr. Rizal stepped ashore in Manila.



Dr. Josh pen name is Dimasalang.....

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #83 on: August 07, 2008, 09:31:08 PM »

Iya ig-agaw si Leonor Te Lee?

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #84 on: August 07, 2008, 09:32:21 PM »

Been in Calamba baja pod Rald when I was 19 years old.Nice didto jod.
Thanks for the story,chickboy sija?Love it. ;D

orChids

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Mi último adiós, de José Rizal y Alonso
« Reply #85 on: August 07, 2008, 09:32:56 PM »
Mi último adiós, de José Rizal y Alonso

   Adiós, Patria adorada, región del Sol querida,   Perla del Mar de Oriente, ¡nuestro perdido Edén!   A darte voy alegre la triste mustia vida,   Y fuera más brillante, más fresca, más florida,   También por ti la diera, la diera por tu bien.

   En campos de batalla, luchando con delirio   Otros te dan sus vida sin dudas, sin pesar;   El sitio nada importa, ciprés, laurel o lirio,   Cadalso o campo abierto, combate o cruel martirio,   Lo mismo es si lo piden la Patria y el hogar.

   Yo muero cuando veo que el cielo se colora.   Y al fin anuncia el día tras lóbrego capuz;   Si grana necesitas para teñir tu aurora,   Vierte la sangre mía, derrámala en buen hora   Y dórela un reflejo de su naciente luz.

   Mis sueños cuando apenas muchaco adolescente,   Mis sueños cuando joven ya lleno de vigor,   Fueron el verte un día, joya del Mar de Oriente   Secos los negros ojos, alta la tersa frente,   Sin ceño, sin arrugas, sin mancha de rubor.

orChids

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #86 on: August 07, 2008, 09:34:00 PM »
AKo gipangita sa net, I love this.For the love of country man god.

simplylee

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #87 on: August 07, 2008, 09:41:10 PM »
 uyab sila for 11 years peru wala magdayon kay wala mosugot ang mother ni leonor hangtud nga naminyo na lang si leonor ug lain

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #88 on: August 07, 2008, 10:05:08 PM »



Dong we cant only talk about Rizal without mentioning Mason kay mao nay hinungdan nga gipatay sha!

When we talk someones' life dili lang nimo hisgutan ang ijang life but all aspects...

kay we cnat really deny nga mao nay hinungdan nga he was executed...

and no onecant lie about it!
The best sermons are lived not preached.http://www.facebook.com/daBinsi

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #89 on: August 07, 2008, 10:16:09 PM »


Le, lahi man ang case ni Rizal, kay datu man sha and he was very previledge to study abroad, and he learned so many things  contrary to what the friars taught us! even ang spanis rulers sa Spana has nothing to do with all the attitudes these friars showd us. If you all know what they showd us was not only to teach about christianity which is so different from the EDUCATED COUNTRIES. If you guys remember that people were not allowed to read the bible during the Spanish regime.....(sumpayi ninyo kay mangita sa ko ug kape)

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #90 on: August 07, 2008, 11:58:58 PM »
Quote
Le, lahi man ang case ni Rizal, kay datu man sha and he was very previledge to study abroad, and he learned so many things  contrary to what the friars taught us! even ang spanis rulers sa Spana has nothing to do with all the attitudes these friars showd us. If you all know what they showd us was not only to teach about christianity which is so different from the EDUCATED COUNTRIES. If you guys remember that people were not allowed to read the bible during the Spanish regime.....(sumpayi ninyo kay mangita sa ko ug kape)

Rizal was already different from his contemporaries that studied in Europe, 'te, because the man was a polymath. Whatever he touched, he mastered its understanding ranging not only in Medicine (he specialized in Opthalmology), but in History, Philosophy, Architectural Science, Fencing, over 8 languages, Journalism, Novelty, and many more to even list. The man did not come from an elitist family, no not at all, but came from an average middle class family. Whose father was  Chinese and his mother a Spanish-Mestiza. He was one of 11 children; all of whom were educated by the will of their father. They came from rather humble beginnings. It is also important to note, 'te, that money itself does not bring intelligence; one can be extremely rich but have the mind of a pear. One can be poor and have the mind of a sponge, like that of Rizal, and absorb everything one hears, learns, reads.

Rizal, is just like that. He was not 'rich', but he was intelligent. It wasn't his monetary income that sent him to Paris, Hiedelberg, Madrid, Barcelona. Nay, because he came to Madrid to study without his parents knowing it. :) He finished his medical licentiate and practiced opthalmology in Spain, continued his studies in Germany and France. He made friends through his own intellect and god-given whit.

He focused his energy on written works that addressed the Spanish Cortes and the reading citizenry of Spain; whose focus was to address the grievances that the Noble Filipino people were subject to by the Colonial Government in the Islands and also the pseudo-feudalism that the Friars were ruling the islands in. These friars in question were politically-minded and advocates of the current status quo; keep that in mind.

This is the very reason why some Friars and Church leaders within the Philippines regarded Rizal as a threat. Clearly, corruption within the church leaders, at that time, is visible. For centuries they had significant power in the islands and for them, the 19th century was a tumultuous epoch due to the liberalization of Spain's policies in the islands. Hundreds of more Filipinos (Creole, Mestizo and even Indio) were sent abroad to Spain and Europe to be educated; coming back and bringing their European ideals with them--to the detriment of the old governing system and old traditionalist views circulated. It was a clash of ideals; clash of views. Rizal, for all counts and purposes, represented this new Filipino-hood. Represented the vocal Filipino, one who knew his history as well as cultural ties.

You see it is true what you say, 'te Belle, that the friars that ran the dioceses in the Philippines were indeed corrupt. They ran the entire country's churches in almost an absolutist-autocratic manner. They ran it as if they were still living in the 16th century when the country was still non-christian, paganistic, animimalistic; Pre-Hispanic. Rizal, in his works, voiced his concerns about this multiple times in La Solidaridad because he understood the beauty of the Mother-Child relations between Spain and the Philippines. He studied the ethnological nature, the cultural assimilations and what not; but he questioned the religious mannerism that the church ruled the islands. In this, he pointed out that the Philippines, was a representative of Hispanidad in Asia. A pivotal and significant member of the Spanish Empire; in that the Filipinos were civilized in manner as which Spain had envisioned during its days of Pax Hispanica (from 1492-1850). Rizal championed the advances in science, in language learning, education (though it was limited to the elite class and those with economic substance), as well as the bureaucracy. Evolutionarily speaking, the country had transitioned itself from feudal barbarism of pre-Hispanidad to one that was a member of Latin States, with a people that knew how to speak Spanish as the Lingua Franca, but also retained the indigenous dialects from region to region (tagalog, bisaya, illocana, pampanganero, chabacano etc). Yet, even despite this culturo-socio-economico-political transition, still the churches ruled in feudalry. Rizal pointed this out TIME and TIME again. And it sheds light to the abuses of power of the past.

Rizal, in his writings, makes it clear that what the church should have done was to mold itself and change as the population changed. In this I mean that as the Philippine Islands became more and more Spanish-European in culture and societal aspects; so too the church should have loosened its control and liberalized its agenda. Rather, what we see in the country, historically speaking, is that the country moved towards transition, education, agricultural reformation etc, but the church leaders in the land--in union with some Filipino Peninsulares members (landed Aristocracy) favored the antithesis of the present phenomena of the day.

Rizal, by chance and perhaps by the will of Providence, voiced out the need to change.

What makes him so popular was due to his moderate toned nature. Never so radical to declare death to the church or the Spanish regime, yet not too weak as to deafen or dilute the pains and grievances of the Filipino people. His fellow, "Malay Brothers".



If you have any other questions, feel free to ask. :)

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #91 on: August 08, 2008, 09:48:15 AM »

Ms. Orchids,

There are historians, writers, journalists in Spain who, to this day, regard Rizal as a Christ-like figure.
I read this and was astonished by it semesters ago when I took a class on Spanish Imperialism and focused on writers of the different parts of the Empire.

But rather interesting in how many Spaniard youth have an almost nostalgic view towards its former colonies such as Philippines, Mexico, Argentina, Columbia, Cuba.

Surprisingly there are historians in Spain and in the Latin World who know of the name of Jose P. Rizal.
He stands on the same pedestal as that of Generallisimo Simon Bolivar, the liberator of Columbia, Bolivia, Peru, Venezuela. Rizal is compared to Fundamentalist and Humanitarian writers in Mexico, Argentina, Peru, Columbia, Cuba, Chile etc on the eve of their national revolutions.

That says alot about the man.

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #92 on: August 08, 2008, 12:30:00 PM »

Dong, there's a growing number of Filipinos who regard Rizal as Christ-like.  They are the Rizalians from the Knights of Rizal. 
It is only with the heart that one can see rightly; what is essential is invisible to the eye.
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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #93 on: August 08, 2008, 01:43:03 PM »
There are Rizal like in our midst. Bran like you, your intelligent, idealistic, good education. But many pursued riches and materials thing in life instead of liberating our country from elitist corrupt Politician. Injustice and poverty is rampant. But many of us really don't care.

Rizal, has pursued love of Country above anything else. That what unique about this man. He offered his life to liberate from us the atrocities inflicted by the Spanish colonizer.

That why He said, That "The Youth of today is future of our of Country" Kinsa man karon ang mga batan-on ang nagkabana para mabag-o ang situation sa Filipinas ang bayan natin mahal.

Do We have Rizal in our midst?

Stand up, and say No to vote buying, corruption, injustice and etc.



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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #94 on: August 09, 2008, 04:38:03 AM »

We can only served one master.

When the Lord was tempted by Satan, to follow me and all things you saw will be yours.

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #95 on: August 09, 2008, 10:07:17 AM »
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The statue of Dr.José Rizal in the Rizal-Park of Wilhelmsfeld/Odenwald near Heidelberg - made by the Philippine artist Caedo - erected 1978

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The Supreme Commander of the Knights of Rizal, Sir Vicente Palmon (fifth person from the left) and the Deputy Supreme Commander, Sir Carmelo Gempesaw (second person from the left) with Sir Rainer Weber - Chapter Commander of the Wilhelmsfeld-Heidelberg-Chapter (third person from the right) - with some other Chapter Commanders from Belgium, Austria, Spain and Germany.

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In Germany. The adopted son of Deutschland.

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #96 on: August 09, 2008, 10:14:14 AM »
In 1885, having completed the second of his two courses, with his credentials of licentiate in medicine and also in philosophy and literature, Rizal made a trip through the country provinces to study the Spanish peasant, for the rural people, he thought, being agriculturists, would be most like the farmer folk of his native land. Surely the Filipinos did not suffer in the comparison, for the Spanish peasants had not greatly changed from the day when they were so masterfully described by Cervantes. It seemed to Rizal almost like being in Don Quixote’s land, so many were the figures who might have been the characters in the book.

The fall of ’85 found Rizal in Paris, studying art, visiting the various museums and associating with the Lunas, the Taveras and other Filipino residents of the French capital, for there had been a considerable colony in that city ever since the troubles of 1872 had driven the Tavera family into exile and they had made their home in that city. In Paris a fourth of “Noli Me Tangere” was written, and Rizal specialized in ophthalmology, devoting his attention to those eye troubles that were most prevalent in the Philippines and least understood. His mother’s growing blindness made him covet the skill which might enable him to restore her sight. So successfully did he study that he became the favorite pupil of Doctor L. de Weckert, the leading authority among the oculists of France, and author of a three-volume standard work. Rizal next went to Germany, having continued his studies in its language in the French capital, and was present at Heidelberg on the five hundredth anniversary of the foundation of the University.

b125 - Dr. José Protacio Rizal, M.D. - Philippine Photo Gallery
Rizal in Juan Luna’s studio in Paris, France.


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The Portrait of Rizal in 1883 Painted in Oil by Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo. Back when he was still in Madrid, Spain.



For more, please visit the source:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/6867/6867-h/6867-h.htm

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #97 on: August 09, 2008, 10:15:00 AM »

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Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal
« Reply #98 on: August 09, 2008, 10:24:18 AM »
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/6867/6867-h/img/b125.jpg[/img]
Rizal in Juan Luna’s studio in Paris, France.


a002 - Dr. José Protacio Rizal, M.D. - Philippine Photo Gallery
The Portrait of Rizal in 1883 Painted in Oil by Felix Resurreccion Hidalgo. Back when he was still in Madrid, Spain.


These photos you published here are protected "do not inline project gutenberg images"

Lorenzo

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xx - Dr. José Protacio Rizal, M.D. - Philippine Photo Gallery
Re: Dr. José Protacio Rizal, M.D.
« Reply #99 on: August 09, 2008, 10:35:28 AM »
The site allowed copying and sharing of information by basis of the ebook.

From the site:

The Project Gutenberg EBook of Lineage, Life and Labors of Jose Rizal:
Philippine Patriot, by Austin Craig

This eBook is for the use of anyone anywhere at no cost and with
almost no restrictions whatsoever.  You may copy it, give it away or
re-use it under the terms of the Project Gutenberg License included
with this eBook or online at www.gutenberg.net


For those who want to see more pictures and read more; please visit:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/6867/6867-h/6867-h.htm


Cheers,



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Was Dr Jose Rizal Right?

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