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Lorenzo

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How 'Chinese' is the Filipino People?
« on: February 06, 2013, 01:07:54 PM »
How 'Chinese' is the Filipino People?

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Lorenzo

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Re: How 'Chinese' is the Filipino People?
« Reply #1 on: February 06, 2013, 01:10:42 PM »
Answer:

1.7% of the Philippine Population are of pure Chinese ancestry [about 1.7 million]. However, it estimated that 25% of the entire Filipino Population have Chinese ancestry. About 25 million Filipinos have Chinese ancestors.



Reference:
wikipedia

Lorenzo

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Re: How 'Chinese' is the Filipino People?
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2013, 11:30:30 PM »
Most experts  point to Chinese origins of the terms KUYA and ATE. Kuya is said to be a combination of two Chinese words: ko (elder brother) and a (a term of kinship); ate from the same a plus chi (elder sister).

Cool , diba? 8)

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Re: How 'Chinese' is the Filipino People?
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2013, 11:32:33 PM »
"Ate" and "Kuya" are addressed to the eldest among the siblings. The origin of these honorific titles are Chinese. The Chinese word for elder brother is "ko" and "a" modifies the word to mean "kin". Likewise, "Ate" is from "chi" and preceded by "a", this becomes "achi". In fact, this is how the Kapampangan (a major language in Central Luzon, not Tagalog) says it.

In some Tagalog regions and other parts of the north, the second eldest is called "diko" for males and "ditse" for females. In Chinese, "di" means "second".  In some places, others pronounce this as "dete". "Sangko" means third in the heirarchy of birth. In Chinese, "sang" is "three" in the ordinal count.

Some stops here, but others go on to define their siblings accordingly. Thus, "sitse" for elder fourth sister and "siko" for elder fourth brother (Chinese "si", four) if another one comes along. As for the youngest, the Tagalog addresses them as "Totoy" for little boy, which in Chinese means "foolish son"; and "Nene" for little girl or "dull one" in Chinese. Totoy can become "utoy", "ato", "atoy", "toy", "toytoy", and "Nene" can be "ineng," "neng", or "nini".

8)



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Do you know what part of China the Filipino-Chinese came from?

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