Fully Managed WordPress Hosting
best website hosting service company

How 5 of History's Worst Pandemics Finally ended

  • 2 replies
  • 978 views
*

islander

  • *****
  • 46806
  • If you're from Pluto, you're welcome.
How 5 of History's Worst Pandemics Finally ended
« on: June 21, 2020, 10:26:31 PM »
How 5 of History's Worst Pandemics Finally ended

Dave Roos
March 27, 2020

As human civilizations flourished, so did infectious disease. Large numbers of people living in close proximity to each other and to animals, often with poor sanitation and nutrition, provided fertile breeding grounds for disease. And new overseas trading routes spread the novel infections far and wide, creating the first global pandemics.

Here's how five of the world's worst pandemics finally ended.

Linkback: https://tubagbohol.mikeligalig.com/index.php?topic=114184.msg685121#msg685121
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

*

islander

  • *****
  • 46806
  • If you're from Pluto, you're welcome.
Re: How 5 of History's Worst Pandemics Finally ended
« Reply #1 on: June 21, 2020, 10:33:57 PM »
1. Plague of Justinian---No One Left to Die


Yersinia pestis, formerly pasteurella pestis, was the bacteria responsible for the plague. Here it's seen under optical microscopy X 1000. BSIP/Universal Images Group/Getty Images

Three of the deadliest pandemics in recorded history were caused by a single bacterium, Yersinia pestis, a fatal infection otherwise known as the plague.

The Plague of Justinian arrived in Constantinople, the capital of the Byzantine Empire, in 541 CE. It was carried over the Mediterranean Sea from Egypt, a recently conquered land paying tribute to Emperor Justinian in grain. Plague-ridden fleas hitched a ride on the black rats that snacked on the grain.

The plague decimated Constantinople and spread like wildfire across Europe, Asia, North Africa and Arabia killing an estimated 30 to 50 million people, perhaps half of the world's population.

People had no real understanding of how to fight it other than trying to avoid sick people, says Thomas Mockaitis, a history professor at DePaul University. As to how the plague ended, the best guess is that the majority of people in a pandemic somehow survive, and those who survive have immunity.

Linkback: https://tubagbohol.mikeligalig.com/index.php?topic=114184.msg685122#msg685122
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

*

islander

  • *****
  • 46806
  • If you're from Pluto, you're welcome.
Re: How 5 of History's Worst Pandemics Finally ended
« Reply #2 on: June 24, 2020, 03:38:52 AM »
2. Black Death—The Invention of Quarantine

A couple suffering from the blisters of the Black Death, the bubonic plague that swept through Europe in the Middle Ages. From the Swiss manuscript the Toggenburg Bible, 1411.
VCG Wilson/Corbis/Getty Images

The plague never really went away, and when it returned 800 years later, it killed with reckless abandon. The
Black Death[/url], which hit Europe in 1347, claimed an astonishing 200 million lives in just four years.[/font][/size][/font]
As for how to stop the disease, people still had no scientific understanding of contagion, says Mockaitis, but they knew that it had something to do with proximity. That’s why forward-thinking officials in Venetian-controlled port city of Ragusa decided to keep newly arrived sailors in isolation until they could prove they weren’t sick.[/font][/size][/color]
At first, sailors were held on their ships for 30 days, which became known in Venetian law as a trentino[/font][/size]. As time went on, the Venetians increased the forced isolation to 40 days or a quarantino, the origin of the word quarantine and the start of its practice in the Western world.
[/color]“That definitely had an effect,” says Mockaitis.[/size]

Linkback: https://tubagbohol.mikeligalig.com/index.php?topic=114184.msg685145#msg685145
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

 

best website hosting service company
Fully Managed WordPress Hosting