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Way Nada

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #20 on: April 13, 2008, 05:59:13 AM »

Happy,

I think it refers to a people. My Lola used to say when she sees a person with an Indian stock as "Wadje". Now we used to say when we see an Indian as "Bombay". Wadje was named after a people. Wadje is used also as a family name.

WN

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #21 on: April 13, 2008, 06:02:36 AM »
I have never heard of Wadje before, until I read this thread.

But then it gives me a confusion, is it a family name or a people ???

Happy,

I think it refers to a people. My Lola used to say when she sees a person with an Indian stock as "Wadje". Now we used to say when we see an Indian as "Bombay". Wadje was named after a people. Wadje is used also as a family name.

WN
[/quote]

Ah ok, so mao na ang karon atong ingnon ug Bombay.

Salamat sa explaination WN :)
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Macky Ferniz

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #22 on: April 13, 2008, 07:42:09 PM »
I have never heard of Wadje before, until I read this thread.

But then it gives me a confusion, is it a family name or a people ???

Happy,

I think it refers to a people. My Lola used to say when she sees a person with an Indian stock as "Wadje". Now we used to say when we see an Indian as "Bombay". Wadje was named after a people. Wadje is used also as a family name.

WN
[/quote]

Thanks Mr. Matig-a for this very interesting topic.

Since the Spanish conquestadors have literally erased/conspired/fabricated our history and heritage, all we can do is conduct a constructive history through existing facts, physical/geographical observation, forensics, genetics and based on parallel history.

With reference to the Wadje, the evidence of its existence is erased and as you said, the bridge linking the past is destroyed. However, I can not see any physical evidence as to the existence of Indian existence based on the following:
1. As said, Wadje is an Indian race, but people in that area does not depict the characteristics of Indian facial and physical features like long noses & big eyes.
2. Most of the Indians (Hindus) would build temples wherever they migrate. However, there is no single physical evidence or artifact found linking to Hinduism practice; i.e. jars, temples, ceramics, metal works..etc.

However, our quest for the truth does not end in a stalemate. So, I run a search and found some facts that would probably link us to the truth of this mystery.

I found that there is an Aborigine Tribe in Australia and New Guinea that is called Wadji-wadji. Their physical characteristics are dark brown, big eyes, but flat noses. Native Australians could navigate vast distances often traveling through the aid of stars.

Hence, we could only postulate posibilities that the Wadje are the Wadji-wadji tribe who migrated from Australia to Bohol.

As to the name, we can interchange the vowels “i” & “e” without affecting the meaning.

Geographically, there are more odds/possibility for travellers to reach Bohol from Australia or New Guinea than India.

The only way to prove this hypothesis is conduct blood test to every male, non-migrant residents from Ubujan to Cortes and see if we can obtain significant percentage of Indian or Aboriginee genetic marker on thier Y-chromosomes.

Hope you consider my suggestions as basis of a new historical study.
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Macky Ferniz

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #23 on: April 13, 2008, 10:27:32 PM »

Happy,

I think it refers to a people. My Lola used to say when she sees a person with an Indian stock as "Wadje". Now we used to say when we see an Indian as "Bombay". Wadje was named after a people. Wadje is used also as a family name.

WN

Thanks Mr. Matig-a for this very interesting topic.

Since the Spanish conquestadors have literally erased/conspired/fabricated our history and heritage, all we can do is conduct a constructive history through existing facts, physical/geographical observation, forensics, genetics and based on parallel history.

With reference to the Wadje, the evidence of its existence is erased and as you said, the bridge linking the past is destroyed. However, I can not see any physical evidence as to the existence of Indian existence based on the following:
1. As said, Wadje is an Indian race, but people in that area does not depict the characteristics of Indian facial and physical features like long noses & big eyes.
2. Most of the Indians (Hindus) would build temples wherever they migrate. However, there is no single physical evidence or artifact found linking to Hinduism practice; i.e. jars, temples, ceramics, metal works..etc.

However, our quest for the truth does not end in a stalemate. So, I run a search and found some facts that would probably link us to the truth of this mystery.

I found that there is an Aborigine Tribe in Australia and New Guinea that is called Wadji-wadji. Their physical characteristics are dark brown, big eyes, but flat noses. Native Australians could navigate vast distances often traveling through the aid of stars.

Hence, we could only postulate posibilities that the Wadje are the Wadji-wadji tribe who migrated from Australia to Bohol.

As to the name, we can interchange the vowels “i” & “e” without affecting the meaning.

Geographically, there are more odds/possibility for travellers to reach Bohol from Australia or New Guinea than India.

The only way to prove this hypothesis is conduct blood test to every male, non-migrant residents from Ubujan to Cortes and see if we can obtain significant percentage of Indian or Aboriginee genetic marker on thier Y-chromosomes.

Hope you consider my suggestions as basis of a new historical study.

BINGO!

I just found a place in New Guinea named "Wadji" with coordinates: 5° 25' 0" South, 144° 5' 0" East. This is just a straight nagivation down southeast from Samar and Leyte.

This is a strong support to my above hypothesis.

Way Nada

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #24 on: April 14, 2008, 06:56:05 AM »
Macky,

Wadje is an Indian race and while the totally pure stock is erased because of inter-marriage, there are still many people in our place feature the looks of an Indian. Before the Spaniards, they came as conquerors under the Madjapahit empire. The culprit here are the Spaniards as what you said; "the Spanish conquestadors have literally erased/conspired/fabricated our history and heritage". For example are the people of Cainta, Rizal who are also "Wadje". When Manila was conquered by the Spaniards they looked for a hiding place and settle in Cainta, Rizal. Everything about their looks and their way of life is distinctively Indian but the Spanish historians kept silent about them. There was even an elephant that was unearthed in Cainta before but there was no talk why and how did it happen that an elephant was there in Cainta. Instead the Spanish historian confused us by telling us the name of the king of Manila who is Rajah Suleiman. The confusion is this; Rajah is a word in Sanskrit meaning king while Suleiman is an Arabic name. How can you reconcile Sanskrit to a Muslim name?

Those ancient people in the Visayas were temple builders. They built the Borubudur temple in Java, and there is a possibility that when they built the Baclayon church they left remnants of the past. I am going to post my next installment because I wrote about the gargoyle of Baclayon.

WN

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #25 on: April 14, 2008, 07:10:34 AM »

Tagbilaran… A Glimpse

The church of Baclayon reveals its past by a gargoyle, I believe without the knowledge of the Spanish architect, installed by the workers or laborers on the ledge of the first base of the bell tower that looks like a Hindu god or the bust of Buddha.

In 1596 when Fr. Juan de Torres and Fr. Gabriel Sanchez erected the church in Baclayon the people refused to cooperate and defied to build the church. This is normal behavior of a people not to accept instantly the laws and government of a foreign power. One written account says; the Boholanos’ [people of Baclayon] initial reception of the missionaries was cold. The presence of Spanish tax collectors had made them suspicious. The Jesuits had to muster their skills at persuasion, even using dramatic and rhetorical devices to state their intention. Another factor of the cold reception was they were not understood by the natives because they were speaking Spanish and the people resisted to follow a new religion and moreover it is not easy to force and ram a new religious belief through their throat. This made the missionary priests transferred their residence to Loboc and delayed the construction of the church. The reason of Moro marauders harassing them is only a cover up of the suppression and repression of the people that took place after the priests fled to Loboc.

Twenty five years after they erected the visita in 1596 the people of Baclayon revolted led by Tamblot. This revolt was reduced by the Spanish historians as a babaylan revolt. Tamblot is referred here as a babaylan or a medicine man. I think this is doubtful history because a medicine man or a quack doctor does not command big followers and cannot influence the people to revolt because his work was not with the socio-political and religious affairs of the people. My hunch is Tamblot was a “Hindu Guru” who had religious powers and socio-political influence of the people. I can surmise that the revolt was suppressed by the Spanish authorities and caused the continuation of the construction of the church even without the supervision of a priest. While it is on records that in a span of 130 years there was no parish priest assigned in Baclayon, the Spanish civil authority and government was centered here. The fact that this church has a dungeon is indicative of a clandestinely operational justice system and it stands to reason that civil authority was functioning and the unfinished church served as a government house. Baclayon became a parish only in 1717 but it was in the year 1726 that a parish priest was assigned permanently.

In addition to my opinion of the gargoyle of the church of Baclayon as the bust of Buddha or the god Diva, [Diva is Sanskrit for spirit god where we got the word ‘Diwa’ and Divata is another spirit which we got the word ‘Diwata’] the carvings also on the door of the church is characteristic of the stone carvings in the Borubudur temple of Java. I cannot offer any hard evidence for this except a conjectural opinion that those carvers or sculptors involved in building the church of Baclayon, if they were not Spaniards then, they might be the temple builders of Java and Bali with the orientation of the cultures of the Sri-Vijayan and the Majapahit Empires. The spin that the stone tablets of the church were stuck together with a million egg whites is good only to attract tourists but this type of information is purely rubbish. “Di porbidang daghanang tortillas itlog adto. Napo-o ang mga manok sa Baclayon ug mao nang kalakiha.”

WN


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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #26 on: April 14, 2008, 07:37:10 AM »
For the readers that are not acquainted with the Majapahit Empire that WN metioned in this thread;

The Majapahit Empire was a Malay civilization based in eastern Java near the cities of Majapahit and Jawadwipa where it developed into a oceanic trading organization, an empire so to say. Majapahit eventually usurped regional authority from the declining Sri Vijayan Empire, another malay-based oceanic empire.

What was interesting about the Majapahit is that it is purely Malay so to speak, whereas the emperors and rulers of Sri Vijaya were of Indian decent. Majapahit, on the other hand hailed rulers that were of the same racial stock ranging from Yogyakarta, Bedahulu lombok miran, Palembang and central Java. Why even the greatest of the emperors to sit on the throne of Majapahit was Wayam Wuruk, who was central Javanese.  A pure Malay, as the cradle of the Malay Race is Java. (Modern day Filipino Malays came from Borneo--who iimmigrated north from Java as a result of over population; hence the colonization of the philippinese. Hence the Philippines, Malaysia, Indonesia are known as the MALAY ARCHIPELAGO)

The Majapahit Empire was successful in their policies in that the state religion was Hinduism; and the royal house employed a very militaristic policy, compared to the more theocratic and diplomatic stance of the former Sri Vijaya, which can explain the eventual decline of Sri Vijaya, in that their emperors eventually adopted a more religious stance on politics; abandoning external threats and needs for internal meditiation. Which was a characteristic in the form of thervada buddhism that was practiced by Sri Vijayan God-Kings. This so called internal transcendance to divinity directly led to usurpation of power by the Majapahit Malays. The monk-kings of Srivijaya in its later phase were weak and unable to hold their own ground against the rising militaristic faction that was Majapahit.

When you mention the name Wadji, it reminded me of a famous Malay general-lord by the name of Raden Wijaya, who actually employed a brilliant diplomatic stance with the Mongol Yuan Dynasty of China. Wijaya asked military aid from the Yuan dynasty in handling internal problems with the Jayakatwang state, once the problem was effaced, the forces of Majapahit turned against their Mongol allies, annihilating most of the army and forcing the remaining forces out of the Majapahit Empire.

These majapahit malays were able to defeat and force out the feared Mongol Empire out of their own domain; a force of over 100,000 mongol forces were defeated and rooted out. Can you imagine such a number? It is the same number that was sent to Japan and was lost to the famed Kami-Kaze.

Amazing isn't it?

WN and Mr. Fernized mentioned about hindu temples; the following were the temples built by Majapahit throughout its empire.

399px-Bajang_Ratu_Gate%2C_Trowulan - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol
The remnants of Majapahit Imperial Capital in Bajang Ratu

429px-Wringin_Lawang%2C_Trowulan - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol
Temple building in Wiri Ngin Lawang


Way Nada

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #27 on: April 14, 2008, 07:12:41 PM »
Lorenzo,

I have this feeling that the temple of our ancestors that was built in the Philippines was covered by the construction of churches, just the church of our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico city is found on top of an old Aztec temple. Maybe someday a strange sculpted figure can be discovered in one of these churches.

WN

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #28 on: April 14, 2008, 07:35:47 PM »
WN,

I have seen the gargoyle photo in Baclayon when I searched the net and it represents a square face similar to Budha sculptures in Srilanka. Note that in China, most of the Budha sculptures are oval or round shape. This may explain the existence of Sri-vijayan empire which originated from Srilanka or Ceylon.

Will you post the picture here or if you allow, I have the picture and I will post.

Regards

Way Nada

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #29 on: April 15, 2008, 06:36:03 AM »
Macky,

Please post the picture... And how about the carvings on the door? If the carvings on the door was done by a native Boholano in the 16th or 17th century his cutural influence must be from the Sri-Vijayan or the Majapahit empires and not with the European cultures.

WN

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #30 on: April 15, 2008, 06:40:43 AM »

That is very plausible, Mr. Matig-a.

Perhaps, that maybe just so.

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #31 on: April 15, 2008, 06:59:26 AM »
Lorenzo,

I have this feeling that the temple of our ancestors that was built in the Philippines was covered by the construction of churches, just the church of our Lady of Guadalupe in Mexico city is found on top of an old Aztec temple. Maybe someday a strange sculpted figure can be discovered in one of these churches.

WN

That is very plausible, Mr. Matig-a.

Perhaps, that maybe just so.
[/quote]

Lorenzo,

This is my clear perception because long time ago countries went to war because of religion. During the crusade Christian soldiers built churches on top of the temple of Solomon. When the Christians were defeated by the Muslim, churches were demolished and on top they built the dome of the rock. The is a symbol of victory that their god is better than your god. Until now in Jerusalem this is the cause of conflict.

WN

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #32 on: April 15, 2008, 07:30:21 AM »
Mr. Matig-a,

That is a very strong point. Perhaps there are ruins of temples underneath the churches of the Philippines.
Perhaps in the future, some archaeologists will be able to unearth the grounds around churches to any remains of old temples.

Nonetheless, you do have a point about the religious wars and specifically the building of Mexico City on top of the ruins of Tenochtitlan, the former capital of Azteca civilization. In fact you are right, the current Catedral Metropolitania in Mexico City was built over the Azteca sacrificial pyramid.

Here is the view of the Catedral; it is a huge cathedral that was designed by the Spanish in the 16th century; and is the largest Catholic Cathedral in the Latin World outside of Spain.

catedral_mexico - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol

Catedral%20de%20M%E9xico - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol

Macky Ferniz

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #33 on: April 15, 2008, 02:48:24 PM »

Thanks WN,

This is the photo of Gargoyle found in Baclayon Church which depicts the face of Budha. Notice the near square figure of the face which is common sculpture of Srilankan or Thai Budha. As noted, Shri Vijayans empire streched from Java to Ancient Champa Kingdom (Thailand & Vietnam) and its origin is from Sri Lanka or Ceylon.

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #34 on: April 15, 2008, 03:36:07 PM »
WN,

About the Door Carving of Baclayon Church, I compared it with traditional wood carving in Bali Indonesia. Please notice the close similarity.

Baclayon Church Door Carving
doorcarvingck0 - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol

Here is the whole door view
doorcarving2pb0 - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol

Now folks, notice its significance to Bali's Traditional carving. Note that Bali is believed to be the last refuge of the Sri Vijayan Empire.

Bali Traditional Carvings:
woodcarvingbalivg1 - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol

woodcarvingbali2am6 - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol

woodcarvingbali3kf4 - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol

woodcarvingbali4fd0 - Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol - Tagbilaran City - Bohol

Carving is like handwriting to the craftsman and patern is like its alphabet.


Further, the above door carving at Baclayon Church is obviously a Lotus flower, which is a significant Symbol of Budhism and Hinduism. Since Budhism is a derivative from Hinduism, both religions worshiped the lotus as favorite flower of thier gods. It represents eternity, purity and divinity and is widely used as a symbol of life & fertility.

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #35 on: April 16, 2008, 01:42:12 PM »
Macky & Lorenzo:

Thanks for the pictures. Below the gargoyle there is a carving that looks like an emblem. I can't decipher the meaning of that emblem. Between the two ventilation holes of the bell tower there is another symbolic escutcheon or something like a seal. I think this will need physical inspection.

Salamat!

WN

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #36 on: April 16, 2008, 01:52:51 PM »
Tagbilaran… A Glimpse

Historical inconsistency:

Miguel Lopez de Legaspi sailed from Navidad, New Spain [Mexico] across the Pacific Ocean and landed in the shores of Cebu on February 13, 1565. After seeing the natives hostile to him he weighed anchor and sailed for Leyte and Camiguin but the wind drifted his boat to Bohol. In adjoining stories the Purtuguese led Legaspi to Bohol. Another was along the way he met a Mohammedan pilot in the high sea and led him to Datu Sikatuna in Bohol. But on his way to Leyte and Camiguin he bypassed Bohol after leaving Cebu maybe because he was still looking for somebody that will lead him to Sikatuna.   

In Arcila’s, “Jose S. Rizal and the Emergence of the Philippine Nation” 2001 revised edition, according to Rizal's sources, Pagbuaya gave Legaspi sea pilots. Hence, it is very likely that the pilots brought Legazpi to Bohol or, if not, informed Legazpi about Bohol when the expedition was near the island.

It looks like history is making Rizal a rumormonger while he was an exile in Dapitan in 1892-93. He wrote to his friend in Germany Ferdinand Blumentritt about Pagbuaya aiding Legaspi by giving him sea pilots. Why is this story of “giving sea pilots to Legaspi” an event that happened 327 years ago blown up in our history books? Did Rizal really write a letter to Blumentritt? If so, what has Blumentritt have to do with that information that happened 327 years ago? Or is this only a whitewash by Spanish historians to cover up a sinister plot between Legaspi and Sikatuna in deceiving the Visayans?

The conquest of Cebu and Bohol:

On 15 April 1565, a month after the blood compact allegedly happened Legazpi took Bohol in the name of the King of Spain without a single drop of blood. He went back to Cebu, allied with Sikatuna, bombarded and conquered it, and on April 27, 1565 founded Cebu. He built the first Spanish settlements, naming it Villa del Santisimo Nombre de Jesús (Town of the Most Holy Name of Jesus) and Villa de San Miguel (Saint Michael's Town). It did not say if Legaspi built a church. The first two Spanish settlements in the Philippines but no church built. But the church of Baclayon commenced its construction in 1596 a span of 24 years after the death of Legaspi in Manila. Legaspi already changed his capital city and died, still no church in Cebu. Is this not also a contradiction?

There was also another Boholano chief who made a blood compact rite with Legaspi after Sikatuna. His name was Si Gala. It is impossible for two chiefs to be living in one place. So Si Gala must be a chief somewhere in Bohol. In the town of Candijay we can find the remains of ancient people discovered at some ledges of a cliff. Chances are that those skeletal remains are that of the people of Si Gala. The name Cimagala is a prominent name in Candijay and I would not discard the possibility that they are the descendants of Si Gala.   

After 1565 there was no more mentioned of Sikatuna. He lived in obscurity or maybe his blood compact with Legaspi blew out and became an embarrassment that caused him to migrate to other islands in the Visayas. I cannot recall if there is any other person with a name Sikatuna, Katuna or Katunao in Bohol. But in Aklan there is a name that sounds like “Katunao” because my mother in law told me that her great great grandparents came and originated from Bohol. According to her, “they were fishermen.” Their surname is “Tugnao”. Is it a coincidence?

The Church of Baclayon:

In 1595 the Spanish authorities in Manila delegated to Bohol two Jesuit priests Fr. Juan de Torres and Fr. Gabriel Sanchez as the first Spanish missionaries or doctrineros in the area. I think this is still debatable because in my view, enforcing a religious faith cannot be easily handled by two priests but I believe there was a presence of a military force to back up the enforcement of the Catholic faith. I mean they enforced it by force.

According to a written account that, shortly after their arrival a visita was erected on the spot. This assertion looks like easy to say but the truth is, it cannot be done by just a snap of a finger but by force because, you cannot change a culture, belief and the way of life of a people overnight. So the building of the visita is through the use of force. A visita is a small extension chapel inside a church or a church that is under a jurisdiction of a parish. Now we can visualize the situation that there was already a building when the visita was erected. The more amiable way in welcoming the two priests according to one of the stories that, the villagers provided a house for the two priests when they arrived in Baclayon. We can make discernment by this story if it was a house or a temple. It is also possible that the house mentioned by the historical account is the religious temple of the people. I tend to believe that Fr. Juan de Torres and Fr. Gabriel Sanchez built the visita inside the adjoining wing of the temple probably after burning all what they believed as idols and things that were contrary to the Catholic religion.

The church of Baclayon which is situated facing just about 25 to 30 meters away from the seashores seems to tell us that before the church was erected there was another edifice or building which welcomed worshippers coming by canoe or boat from the sea. I have this intuitive feeling that the church of Baclayon is founded on an ancient Majapahit or Vijayan temple. Just like the church of the Virgin of Guadalupe in Mexico is founded in an ancient temple of the Aztecs.

Salamat!

WN

Macky Ferniz

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #37 on: April 16, 2008, 07:33:05 PM »
Thanks for the post Mr. WN,

Regarding the emblem, I can not find a clearer shot since I am outside the Philippines and relying only on the internet. Hence, I would appreciate if anybody residing in Bohol could take some close shots of uncommon symbols or emblems in Baclayon Church so it could help us decipher its origins and meanings.

Incase Mr. WN, you have clear photo of the same, appreciate if you could post it here so together we can unearth the true history.

Perhaps this site could guide or be useful reference for our studies: http://www.eastjava.com/books/majapahit/index.html

Macky Ferniz

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #38 on: April 16, 2008, 07:53:33 PM »
Further, I also believed that Dr. Jose Rizal, being a brilliant man, continued his fascination about Philippine history during his excile in Dapitan. He must have gathered reliable information from the 3rd generation descendants of Boholanos who migrated to Dapitan. Note that Dapitan was once the annex of Boholanos who migrated due to tribal conflicts in pre-spanish era, thus there must be frequent travells and exchange of information between both communities. So during the time of Rizal, the people of Dapitan must have a sort of word-by-mouth history from thier great grand parents and Rizal must have noted it.

If there was an educated man who knows better about what twists the spaniards made to our history, it was Dr. Jose Rizal.

Way Nada

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Re: Wadje is no longer a popular name in Bohol
« Reply #39 on: April 17, 2008, 08:22:02 AM »
Macky,

Thanks for the website you posted. I have a new discovery again. I don't aver that I am holding this as the ultimate truth but as the website is suggesting there is a connectivity in our place in Bohol. For example is the word Candijay. People don't know where the word Candijay came from but only speculation that it comes Kang Dihay.

In my analysis the name Candijay was brought to Candijay by people who migrated from Java. The evidence of my assertion is that, in Candijay before the Spaniards came there were people who had a custom of disposing their dead in a ledge of a cliff. There remains were discovered in a ledge near the sea and are on display in the town of Candijay today. Their way of life passed away, became extinct or exterminated during the hispanization of Bohol. But this way of life is still thriving in Sumatra, Java and Kalimantan province of Indonesia. I have seen a documentary movie about these people. They are still disposing their dead on the side of a cliff and they speak almost the same language as the Visayan people.

The website you posted says;

"Mentioned in the Nagarakertagama as one of the places visited by King Hayam Wuruk of Majapahit in 1359, Candi Jajaghu, also known as Candi Jago, or Candi Tumpang, is located 24 kilometres east of the city of Malang. Principally Buddhist in character, Jajaghu was built originally as a mortuary shrine for King Wishnuwardhana of Singosari in the latter half of the 13th century. The building which we see today, however, is probably the result of a renovation carried out in the 1340's on the order of the Sumatran prince Adityawarman, a blood relative of Hayam Wuruk. The temple, which faces west, has a rectangular ground plan measuring 23 X 14 metres. Since the roof and much of the body of the main sanctuary have collapsed, it can only be estimated that the original height of the monument was about 15 metres. Access to the principal shrine is by way of two stairways, which lead up from the front of the building via three receding terraced levels, creating the illusion of ascending a mountain slope."



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