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islander

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #60 on: March 13, 2010, 05:26:51 PM »
You must have had revisionist if not strange readings of reports and case studies and lessons in US foreign policy in your undergraduate years to make you conclude that Marcos was admired for his actions abroad and by the Fil-Am community.
 
There were demonstrations by Fil-Ams in the US in the dead of winter asking then foreign affairs committee chairman Richard Lugar to do something about the political situation in the Philippines.  

(Suggested additional light readings, for starters:  Aquino’s Philippines:  The Center Holds, Sandra Burton, Council on Foreign Relations; The Philippines Chasing Marcos’ Millions, Time Magazine, March 31, 1986)  

And maybe the following speeches (and the data they contain) were missed out in your undergraduate years?

César Gaviria Trujillo, secretary general of the Organization of American States:

Senator Lugar’s support for democracy around the world has been marked by deeds and not just words. He has observed elections in Guatemala and was co-leader of the official U.S. Election Observer Delegation in the 1986 Philippines election in which Corazon Aquino became President. In the Philippines, Senator Lugar highlighted the systematic electoral fraud committed by the Marcos regime and convinced the U.S. government to recognize Mrs. Aquino as the rightful winner.

Is this something about Marcos that Fil-Ams can admire?

Senator Richard Lugar’s tribute to Cory Aquino, 1996 Fullbright Ceremony, US Department of State:

I’ve mentioned my short tenure as chairman of the [Foreign Relations] Committee, and it was fortuitous that those were the years—1985 and 1986—in which this occurred. Fairly early in 1985, we had testimony from the State Department and from our Department of Defense—conspicuous testimony by Paul Wolfowitz and Richard Armitage—as they outlined growing debate within those two departments as to where our interests lay and where they ought to lie in the future. We were sensitized, both as a committee and as a Congress, and as a public, that we had some hard choices ahead of us.

What we could not have imagined was that the focus of this debate in our country might lead President Marcos to call the snap election which he did on the Brinkley program on a Sunday afternoon in November and in essence, challenged us to put up or shut up. The input of that particular program was to say, "I’m calling a special election and I ask anybody in the world who wants to come and observe it—especially you people in the United States. And you will see that I’m going to win it, and I’m going to win it big, and democracy will be served." At that point, the wheels began to move in our committee and within the Reagan administration and particularly in the minds of Secretary George Shultz and of Steve Bosworth, our great ambassador out there on the point. And without going through all of the detail of what occurred, an observer group was named. I was co-chairman with John Murtha, distinguished congressman who still serves in the state of Pennsylvania.

With a host of about 30 distinguished Americans assembled to go to all parts of the Philippines, we negotiated with the Marcos administration on such things as how close we could get to the voting booths. A strange law was adopted shortly before we were underway that 150 feet would be our distance. Then we said we won’t come under those circumstances and to the end Marcos was so eager for us to come that essentially almost all of the rules and stipulations we suggested they acceded to, understanding that 30 people in the midst of that vast country were unlikely to see a whole lot. We proceeded and, in fact, had an experience that is indelible in my memory and, I think, that of our honoree today. Let me just say that the election was one in which our intelligence people told me before I went that President Aquino would be the winner if, in fact, all the votes were counted—at least it was beyond what we call now in our election campaigns the margin of error. But, they indicated to me, she would not be the winner. I had to understand the realpolitik of the situation. It was simply not in the cards, given the nature of the way the election was going to be conducted, despite all of our best efforts to observe and to editorialize. And indeed, as the election approached, a very large number of people were disenfranchised and suddenly strange machinations occurred as some polls reported votes of 400 to 0 and other things to which I’ve become accustomed in some of our own elections in Indiana. We were prepared for the challenge. We were not prepared, I suspect, for the aftermath.


***

Without going through everything that occurred subsequently, let me just say that by Saturday President Reagan had come to a different evaluation, that the election had been fraudulent, indeed, to a grave extent and set in motion events which led to President Marcos being spirited out of the country through Hawaii and President Aquino being sworn in as president.

***

And the ultimate judgment of that election, by our friends not only in Asia—in South Korea—but in Latin America, was that there had been a change in our foreign policy, and President Reagan enunciated that in a speech to the Congress not long thereafter in which he said that our policy will now be to fight totalitarianism of the left and authoritarianism of the right equally, evenhandedly, both—not that one is more of a problem than the other. That was a change, and it was noted by people in Guatemala, in Nicaragua, in El Salvador, in many other places of the earth far away from the Philippines. It was certainly noted in South Korea in a hurry, and I will point out, just for the sake of historical accuracy, when I visited Indonesia later in 1986 that President Suharto sat me down and lectured me for 30 minutes on how he was a grass-roots politician, coming up through the democratic route, so we would not get any ideas while we were visiting Jakarta.

***

And there was Senator Paul Laxalt’s famous advice to Marcos to “cut and cut cleanly”.

Now I wonder what people “abroad and by the Fil-Am community,” to quote you, admire in Marcos.


Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

islander

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #61 on: March 13, 2010, 05:40:56 PM »

Correction (to use your well-mannered term), Republic Acts are passed by a duly elected legislative body while promulgations are enactments, formally proclaiming a new statutory as in effect after it receives final approval.
 
With the executive (Marcos) making legislation (which would have been left to the legislative branch of government in keeping with the ideal of check and balance), the likes of you can certainly conclude that the man’s brilliance never dimmed.  (Although brilliance and inspired and honest leadership don't necessarily go hand in hand.)

Yes, those Republic Acts (or the Batas Pambansa, the name depending on the time of Marcos’s 21-year administration) are still in use, like the independence of Siquijor as a province or the implementation of the metric system in the country.



islander

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #62 on: March 13, 2010, 05:46:46 PM »

And none who made foreign borrowings to fund those projects (with percentages disappearing into some deep pockets to boot) enough to mess the country’s economy.  That’s not my opinion. It’s simple documented fact after legal investigations, a slew of paper trails, and scholarly analyses by experts.  (I dare not go into revisionism because, unlike you, who am I?)



islander

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #63 on: March 13, 2010, 06:09:08 PM »
Thanks for your personal opinion.  This one is mine:

By the very nature of upheavals, some lives are sacrificed.  (“Revolution is like Saturn, it devours its own children.”  Die Revolution ist wie Saturn, sie frißt ihre eignen Kinder. - Danton’s Death, Act I, by Georg Büchner [1813–1837], German dramatist and revolutionary)
 
Marat and Robespierre abused their time in power by eliminating counterrevolutionaries, both real and imagined.  (Lucky us, Marcos and Imelda didn’t meet the fate of Romania’s Ceaucescu and his wife Elena.)  This dark chapter of the French Revolution and the succeeding wars do not necessarily negate what eventually became the current French republic.

As in the time of Marcos, not all poor remained poor.  Manny Villar passes himself off as the poor Tondo boy who made good and became very, very rich.  And stories of riches to rags never abate.  Some people are bound to be greedy, whether they’re politicians or not, Marcos’s time or not.

If Marcos stabilized the Republic, how come your family left such stability and settled in the US?

As for ‘plethoric masses’, I’m just curious about this phrase of yours. 
 
Plethora – large or excessive amount or number
Masses – large but unspecified numbers or quantities


They seem to be one and the same.  (I understand here that by ‘mass’ you refer to people and not lumps.)




hubag bohol

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #64 on: March 13, 2010, 07:26:02 PM »
Issue pa ba diay tawon ni--Marcos and his martial law? It's appalling that some people still believe that Marcos was an enlightened leader and that his martial law was beneficial to the Filipino people.
...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #65 on: March 14, 2010, 09:24:09 AM »
 According to a study in UP the Marcos decrees and edicts that are deemed beneficial to the Filipino people are the OPSF or the law subsidizing the price of oil and the Price Control Law through the Price Stabilization Council which control the price of prime commodity in the market.

===================================================

Islander:

Is.:  yes, as dictated by the world bank and the international monetary fund (IMF) as preconditions for loans.  thus:“Companies importing capital goods could expect approval of foreign loans only if their production processes were geared to exports, decreed the Central Bank.” (Robin Broad and John Cavanagh, Unequal Alliance, University of California Press, 1987)

Reply:

When your a borrower your option is to agree to the conditions of the lender. Why? If your the owner of a bank are you not going to put conditionalities to whoever is going to borrow

money?

Islander:   

and this says it all:

As opportunities for profit in the Third World dwindled, transnational banks and corporations refocused their sights back on the developed world.  Four years as the lead international institution in this era of debt crisis management left the IMF almost universally despised across the South—and nearly broke.  So, the next heir to the international debt and development management throne was anointed: the World Bank, which (with U.S. government blessing) chose structural adjustment of the Philippine

variety as its cure-all.


***
The model, Philippines, having been opened up to the world

economy in new and expanded ways in the early 1980s through

the structural adjustment process, fared among the worst of

the debtor nations. Internal corruption and cronyism combined

with collapsing export earnings to plunge the country into

deep economic and then political crisis.  Only those Filipinos

who managed to salt dollars away abroad through secret and

often illegal capital flight seemed able to avoid the worst of

this all-encompassing crisis.                                 

                         

***
Indeed, in many respects, the one relic of value that a

fleeing Ferdinand Marcos left his successor was a negative

example: a two-decade blueprint for guaranteed economic

disaster. There was much to learn from studying Marcos's

mistakes.  For in the failure of Marcos, the World Bank, and

the IMF lay important lessons that might be applied to another

approach to development—one placing people before the market.

(Robin Broad and John Cavanagh, Unequal Alliance, University

of California Press, 1987; emphasis mine)

Reply:

I cannot agree more the opinion of Robin Broad and her husband

than to say that she, her husband and Walden Bello are not

economist in the real sense but they engaged themselves in

economic politics and as critic of the IMF and the WB. Since

she and her husband's opinion are in harmony with Walden Bello

who is a known leftist professor at UP I can say clearly they

are spinning a leftist bias opinion. Her aim is not for

scholastic records but to destabilize and to put down

conservative governments. Which is why if there is any

scholastic study she had for the Philippines I think it is not

acceptable from the point of view of the Makati Business Club.

Her opinion that; "Ferdinand Marcos left his successor was a

negative example: a two-decade blueprint for guaranteed

economic disaster"... is contradictory to her first statement.

She admits that; "the Philippines is WB/IMF model having been

opened up to the world economy in new and expanded ways in the

early 1980s".... but "fared among the worst of the debtor

nations." Where are her proof?

Islander:
 
Is.:   the 1976 sixth amendment to the 1973 constitution

authorized the chief executive to legislate, as follows:

“Whenever in the judgment of the President there exists a

grave emergency or a threat or imminence thereof, or whenever

the Interim Batasang Pambansa or the regular National Assembly

fails or is unable to act adequately on any matter for any

reason that in his judgment requires immediate action, he may,

in order to meet the exigency, issue the necessary decrees,

orders or letters of instructions, which shall form part of

the law of the land.”

i’m curious as to what’s french and british about it.  (n.b.:

the british government is not authoritarian.)

Reply:

The Philippine government during Marcos copied the French

model which has a strong president, like Marcos himself who

can legislate. So he is a strong president. While Amendment

no. 6 is similar to the British law that gives Reserve Power

to the monarch of England. In case of instability in the

British parliament the monarch can this Reserve Power. It is

like the declaration of Martial Law in the US. The British

system came from or it originated from an authoritarian

regime.     

Islander:

Is.  someone who shouts ‘fire’ in a movie house even if

there’s no fire invites the penalty of arresto menor for

public disturbance and, depending on the damage of his act,

risks charges ranging from misdemeanor to felony, which means

no one is free to shout a false alarm.

Reply:

Correct... that person who shouted "fire" committed a crime.

You got the literal interpretation. But when a journalist is

shouting in the newspaper that his government is on fire, and

politicians are thieves without any supporting evidence he is

free in our system. But in Australia, Britain and Singapore he

will go to jail.

Island:     

any journalist worth his salt will tell us that he only

reports what is there.  journalists are news

reporters/broadcasters/writers, not newsmakers.  whether the

record of killed journalists proves that freedom of the press

is exercised in our country or not depends on one’s

perspective.  the “killers” kill because they believe they’re

justified to silence journalists forever; journalists believe

they’re exercising responsible reporting (what journalist

would say he isn’t?) in their risky profession in which their

lives may just be sacrificed.  that’s perspective.

those unfortunate journalists in the ampatuan massacre were

killed not because they were primarily journalists, i suppose,

but because they were in the line of fire in a deadly

political rivalry where witnesses to the crime were considered

a bane and had to be silenced forever.  as a parallel, most of

the women in that massacre were wives.  there are no

statistics for wives killed; there are for journalists.

Reply:

Journalists worth his salt in our country are a rare specimen.

I believe they are more corrupt than the politicians because

nobody is watching them. The high record of journalists killed

in our country proved that they are too aggressive to write

opinions that are ofensive to somebody. In our country freedom

of the press is to offend. If a journalist is a hard hitter he

should have all the evidences to support all the issues he

brought up. He is not free to lie.

Islander:   

i repeat, there was no freedom of the press during martial

law.

Reply:

Did I not say in my previous opinion that during Martial Law

the press was regulated just like the present system in

Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and Malaysia. Most of these

countries have a press tribunal that any complain about

irresponsible reporting is investigated.   
 
Islander:

Is.:  the ouster of one president who had allegedly plundered

the country’s treasury does not constitute an absence of the

rule of law. 

it seems that after marcos, accusations of plunder against

someone sitting in the highest office of the land is enough to

mobilize large crowds for a mass protest.   

(mobocracy – mob rule or ochlocracy; a government by mob or a

mass of people)

unlikeable as they may seem, the administration that took over

after erap’s ouster wasn’t the mass of people.  the mass of

people went home and went on with their lives.

Reply:

A government of mob is like the Mafia. They know only about

chaos and violence. If you believe in mobocracy then what can

I do.

Island:

Is.:  would that our “onion skin” be shed off simply by

emulating the british system and those of other countries that

you’ve mentioned.  i can’t imagine us valuing our freedom less

than the americans, though.  let’s take both of us; we are

expressing our opinions and are free to do so, as we are doing

it now in tb.  will we be killed?

Reply:

Who will kill us when we are not abusing our freedom?
     
Islander:

today’s monarchies in the countries you’ve mentioned are

ceremonial heads of state.  the running of their government is

left to parliament, with the prime minister as head.  their

governments remain democracies, not monarchies.

Reply:

Not in England. 

Islander:

Is.:  there’s no difference, really.  our own right of

suffrage is also our duty, as it is in the u.s.  (for every

right, we have a concomitant responsibility.)  and there’s no

such law, anywhere, that only the king has the right, as you

say.  as for the “people’s right to freedom of speech” being

“unabridged by law in the US and the Philippines”, surely, you

must have heard of libel cases.  that’s one of the ways our

laws and that of the u.s. “abridge” freedom of speech.

Reply:

That is if you are talking about our right and in the US...it

is a duty in your own interpretation but I am differentiating

suffrage as a duty in Australia and England and suffrage in

the Philippines and the US. In libel it is not abridging the

press because libel is crime again a person's reputation and

honor.

You did not get my point. England with an unwritten

constitution has no "bill of rights" in its originality. The

only person in the constitution who has the right is the king.

All other people are subjects to the king. But today in modern

times parliament legislates the right of the people. In it is

not constitutional but also legislated.     

Islander:

Is.:  there’s no monarch in australia.  as a former colony of

great britain, it is just a member of the commonwealth of

nations (previously named the british commonwealth) whose

members total 54 sovereign states, most of which were former

british colonies or dependencies of those colonies.  malaysia

is also a member.  so are rwanda and zimbabwe.  the latter,

currently with a runaway inflation, has dictator robert

mugabe.

everyone can criticize the monarch in england (the anti-

monarchists are alive and well and vocal), and all laws

anywhere in the civilized world remain unless otherwise

reversed or amended through a legislative process.

Reply:

In my knowledge about Australia in 1970 it was reported on TV

that the monarch of England is the monarch of Australia. In

the 90's again on the news on ABS-CBN it was reported that

Australia was having a referendum to retain the monarch of

England or become a republic. The people voted to retain the

monarch, therefore I believe that the monarch of England is

the monarch of Australia.

The anti monarchy in England can criticize the monarch but not

in the press. I think there is a difference between freedom of

speech and freedom of the press in England. 

==============================================================

My opinion which says that; "The late Princess Diana's

criticism of the monarchy when she was alive is a crime of

treason punishable by beheading." This statement is taken out

of context.

==============================================================

 
Islander:

Is.:  a big mass of people cannot be fooled; the filipino

people are no fools, unless you and i would presume that we

can speak for them as we speak for ourselves.  yes, you and i

could be fools, but those numbers who went to the streets? 

that calls for disbelief.

Reply:

It was easy for the anti Erap to fool the people. The fact

that almost all media outlets in Manila demonized Erap the

more the people were fooled.

Islander:   

yes, erap was democratically elected, but when he was

perceived (please note that in politics, perception is

everything) to have abused his powers, the masses spoke. 

that’s democracy of the streets, whether we like it or not.

Reply:

Not perceived by the people but perceived by media. The media

will always say that their opinion is the opinion of the

people. It is not true. The people spoke in an election. But

some power hungry politicians perceived that the election is

still 4 years long wait. For Filipino politicians one week is

already a long wait for the next election. That is how greedy

they are.

Islander:

 Is.:  granting that marcos was responsible for such miracles,

what happens then to the other two factors, the law of supply

and demand and the vagaries of weather?  the best of policies

would be useless in this case if there’s no rice to export

because there are more mouths to feed now or that production

is damaged because of some force majeure.  by the way,

smuggling exists at all times in any country, martial law or

not, by different smugglers, and will continue to exist for as

long as people give vent to their greed.

currently, the term had also come to mean kleptocratic

governments (i.e. those in positions of power use it to

maximize their own gains) and the legislature is a mere rubber

stamp.  in short, a failed state.

Reply:

You granted that Marcos was able to export rice was a miracle.

So the two other factors that were favorable to Marcos were

also miracles. Kleptocracy... to mean that the Marcos regime

depends also in your perspective viewpoint. Cory and her

kamag-anak Inc. are not keptocrats because you believe them

better than Marcos. With only 6 years in power, with so many

disruption of coupd'etats her kamag-anak were able to build

houses in Green Valley and Antipolo, Rizal. Those who were

attached to the Sumulongs who have no business of any kind

before Cory's term in office, became bigtime instant

businessmen during the Cory administration. I should know

because I am living in Antipolo.

Islander: 

2007 - In September the Transparency International estimate of

the amount embezzled by Marcos is quoted in a report by the

Stolen Assets Recovery Initiative, a joint venture of the

World Bank and the United Nations Office of Drugs and Crime.

According to the report, “The channels whereby the money was

allegedly stolen were diverse, including the takeover of

private companies; creation of monopolies for sugar, coconuts,

shipping, construction, and the media; fraudulent government

loans; bribes from companies; and skimming off foreign loans

and raiding the public treasury. ”

Reply:

Did they prove that Marcos stole the money. He was already

charged of corruption together with Westinghouse Inc. but they

were acquited. Imelda was charged in NY with the RICO case but

was acquited. She was charged in the Philippines of graft but

the SC found her innocent. Everything had been thrown to them

including the kitchen sink. If they are guilty they should be

jailed. And now Bongbong is fast approaching to become another

Marcos in government. Imelda will be singing "Happy Days are

Again".

Islander:

Is.:  and marcos was not a usurper? Please note:

1971 - At a constitutional convention opposition delegates

introduce a provision to prevent Marcos from remaining as head

of state or government once his second term as president has

expired.  Marcos succeeds in having the ban overturned the

following year.

1972 - Using the excuse of an alleged assassination attempt

against Defence Minister Juan Ponce Enrile, Marcos declares

martial law on 21 September, promising to eliminate poverty

and injustice and create a "new society."  It is later

revealed that the assassination attempt had been staged by the

military.

Reply:

Marcos was not an usurper because what he did was through the

workings of the law. Martial Law is legal. It's in the

constitution.

The 1971 concon is irrelevant because it was overtaken by the

declaration of Martial Law. Just imagine the whole concon

delegates were convinced by Marcos to sign the new charter

believing that they will become interim members of the new

parliament.

Enrile's alibi that the attempt on his life was staged as a prelude to Martial Law is unbelievable. He said this during

his rebellion against Marcos when he was looking for allies in

Cory and Cardinal Sin, because his life again is in danger. He

branded Imelda a "kaskasera" and he did look into himself who is also a "kaskasero".   

WN                     

Well written, Way Nada.


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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #66 on: March 14, 2010, 09:26:58 AM »

In the end, over 90 Republic Acts are still maintained and utilized to this day.

:)

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #67 on: March 14, 2010, 09:42:37 AM »
I highly suggest reading Bonner's, Waltzing With A Dictator: The Marcoses and The Making of American Policy (1988); Romulo's, Inside the Palace: The Rise and Fall of Ferdinand and Imelda Marcos (1987), and Gleek's, President Marcos and the Philippine Political Culture (1988).


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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #68 on: March 14, 2010, 09:45:45 AM »
Die Revolution ist wie Saturn, sie frißt ihre eignen Kinder.[/i] - Danton’s Death, Act I, by Georg Büchner [1813–1837], German dramatist and revolutionary)
 
Marat and Robespierre abused their time in power by eliminating counterrevolutionaries, both real and imagined.  (Lucky us, Marcos and Imelda didn’t meet the fate of Romania’s Ceaucescu and his wife Elena.)  This dark chapter of the French Revolution and the succeeding wars do not necessarily negate what eventually became the current French republic.

As in the time of Marcos, not all poor remained poor.  Manny Villar passes himself off as the poor Tondo boy who made good and became very, very rich.  And stories of riches to rags never abate.  Some people are bound to be greedy, whether they’re politicians or not, Marcos’s time or not.

If Marcos stabilized the Republic, how come your family left such stability and settled in the US?

As for ‘plethoric masses’, I’m just curious about this phrase of yours.
 
Plethora – large or excessive amount or number
Masses – large but unspecified numbers or quantities


They seem to be one and the same.  (I understand here that by ‘mass’ you refer to people and not lumps.)





You did not answer my original question:
Has there really been change? The poor remain poor and the rich remain rich. And the greed of politicians continue to rule the day.


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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #69 on: March 14, 2010, 10:03:01 AM »
This is directed towards Way Nada:

(I have several questions, pardon my interest in the subject)

1. What were the military plans that Marcos had regarding the issue of Sabah?

2. How would you describe the Philippine Foreign Policy, during the Marcos Administration, in regards to the War in Vietnam?

3. There are claims that it was Marcos that created the NPA, what, if any, are the odds of this being true, or not?

4. Did the Visayas region benefit under the Marcos Administration, in terms of infrastructure growth? If so, how would it compare to the rest of the country?

5. Why does the current Philippine government choose to retain over 90 Republic Acts that were passed during the Marcos Administration? Why aren't they repealed or abolished?


Thank You.

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« Reply #71 on: March 14, 2010, 08:10:36 PM »

plain ignorance?

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« Reply #72 on: March 14, 2010, 08:43:27 PM »

Bwahaha! Either that, or complicated incompetence! ;D

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« Reply #73 on: March 14, 2010, 09:41:50 PM »

Hahaha some more. ;D  I like both your concise posts.  Just let me apologize because I still have to answer WN and Lorenzo, lengthily, after I'm done with my week's family laundry and weekend general house cleaning. :P

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« Reply #74 on: March 14, 2010, 09:51:29 PM »

I second the emotion. ;)

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« Reply #75 on: March 14, 2010, 09:58:24 PM »

Then there must be no end because these Republic Acts are still being used today, unless Siquijor disappears from the map.  Thank heavens for legislators. :) 

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« Reply #76 on: March 14, 2010, 10:04:41 PM »
 And the greed of politicians continue to rule the day. [/i]



Apparently, you did not understand my answer.  Please read my post again.  After which, mind answering the question contained in that part of my post you quoted? :)

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #77 on: March 15, 2010, 07:12:59 AM »
(I have several questions, pardon my interest in the subject)
[/u]

1. What were the military plans that Marcos had regarding the issue of Sabah?

Reply:

There is no question that North Borneo [sabah] is a Philippine territory. The British annexed the territory to the Federation of Malaya after they were granted independence by the British. The former president Diosdado Macapagal sent then vice president Emmanuel Pelaez to Britain to claim North Borneo for the Philippines without success.

Malaysia in respond to the claim of the territory conducted a referendum asking the people as; "what country do they want to belong... Philippines or Malaysia? The Borneans voted for Malaysia."

When Marcos came to power our military possessed the best fighting men in all of South East Asia. Since Malaysia refused to hand-over the territory to the Philippines Marcos deviced a plan to bring back North Borneo to the Philippines. The military through the approval of Marcos recruited young Tausog Muslims to be trained as "commando fighters" to infiltrate North Borneo and agitate Filipinos living in North Borneo to start an insurgency war against the government of Malaysia.

This happened in the early part of the second term of Marcos. This plan of Marcos was not without a spy in congress. His name is Ninoy Aquino. In a privilege speech he dropped the bomb that the military massacred muslim recruits and one survivor swam from Corregidor and emerged out from the water along Roxas Boulevard. The name of the survivor is Araulo. This person who according to Ninoy emerged out from the sea along Roxas Boulevard... is a fictitious person supplied by a dossier to Ninoy. The press mentioned Araulo but nobody saw this person except in Ninoy's privilege speech. This person and the issue of the massacre were good material to lambast Marcos who was his political enemy. After everything is told and done the massacre that took place in Corregidor according to Ninoy... is a big lie. There was no massacre in Corregidor.

The Corregidor issue angered Nur Misuari who was then a professor at the University of the Philippines. He went back to Sulo and formed the MNLF. I can say that because of his privilege speech Ninoy Aquino was a big factor in the Moro insurgency under Misuari. The next worse thing that happened to the MNLF when Martial Law was declared was that many of them were driven out of Sulo to Sabah. This is why Ninoy in his speaking engagement abroad during his self-exile because of his own making he always tell his listeners that; "there are more than 200 thousands Muslim exiles in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah." He blamed Marcos for the plight of the Muslim exiles but to the person who understands the issue he is to be blamed.   

This issue brought up by Ninoy was a big blow to the government of Marcos that it became too embarrassing for the military to continue with their "commando" training. This scandal reached the British government that commonwealth allies like Australia and New Zealand sent a flotilla of warships into the sea fronting Palawan. To counter the planned sabotage by the Philippines, the gurkha fighters of the British Army was sent into North Borneo... trained the Malaysian Army in counter insurgency and jungle warfare. The last Gurkha that left Sabah [North Borneo] was in 1986 when Marcos military was in disarray and lost already the vigor to fight.

The irony here is that Marcos who dared to fight for our country's territory is a villain and Ninoy who betrayed the aim of the Filipinos to bring North Borneo is a hero.

WN

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #78 on: March 15, 2010, 08:43:44 AM »
(I have several questions, pardon my interest in the subject)
[/u]


2. How would you describe the Philippine Foreign Policy, during the Marcos Administration, in regards to the War in Vietnam?

Reply:

During Marcos time since our military was the strongest in Southeast Asia and with the urging of the US we went to the war in Vietnam. As part of our foreign policy contribution we sent the PHILCAG to Vietnam. Before the Philcag there was the Philippine expeditionary force. We can say that our foreign policy in regards of fighting war against the communists in Vietnam it sits well also with our law illegalizing the Communist Party of the Philippines.   

+++++++++++++++++++++++++++

3. There are claims that it was Marcos that created the NPA, what, if any, are the odds of this being true, or not?

Reply:

Marcos created the NPA is false! NPA is leftist and Marcos authoritarian government was conservative rightist. The Partido Kumunista ng Pilipinas was there in the Philippines before the war. It was founded by Evangelista. His prominent follower was Juan Sumulong the great grandfather of Cory Aquino.

The NPA was founded by Bernabe Buscayno who was once a confidante of Ninoy Aquino. The CCP of Joma Sison fused with Buscayno and the NPA became the armed group of the communist party in our country. When Cory took over power her first land reform beneficiary is the NPA leader Bernabe Buscayno. After Buscayno received largesse from the Cory government... did the NPA insurgency in the Philippines cease? The answer is no.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

4. Did the Visayas region benefit under the Marcos Administration, in terms of infrastructure growth? If so, how would it compare to the rest of the country?

Reply:

Yes, the infrastructure that Marcos built was nationwide but more in his Ilocos region of course. Marcos was not like CPG who had only a hundred meters of concreted road built in his own province of Bohol. That concrete road is in Tubigon.

Marcos will go down in history as the only president who built more roads than all the presidents combined from Aguinaldo to Macapagal. The Philippine-Japan frienship highway was started by Marcos with the building of San Juanico Bridge spanning the islands of Leyte and Samar in the Visayas.

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

5. Why does the current Philippine government choose to retain over 90 Republic Acts that were passed during the Marcos Administration? Why aren't they repealed or abolished?

Reply:

The current government cannot erase the laws of Marcos especially those promulgated during his authoritarian regime because those laws are well crafted by Marcos and his law experts inside his government. Please notice that these are not democratically enacted... as acts of congress. We all agree that in the practice of law Marcos is brilliant and with the help of experts, he meticulously designed the laws to last for years and maybe centuries. 

WN

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Re: Were you there during the First Edsa Revolution?
« Reply #79 on: March 15, 2010, 04:58:55 PM »

Marcos has already gone down in history after bequeathing to the Filipino people and the world a far more enduring legacy than roads and presidential decrees--a greedy and brutal reign that gained him entry to the pantheon of the world's most despised rulers.



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