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1
History / Pandemics That Changed History
« on: March 24, 2020, 08:43:36 PM »

Pandemics That Changed History

HISTORY.COM EDITORS
Updated Mar 23, 2020
Original: Jan 30, 2020

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Universal History Archive/UIG/Getty Images

In the realm of infectious diseases, a pandemic is the worst case scenario. When an epidemic spreads beyond a country’s borders, that’s when the disease officially becomes a pandemic.

Communicable diseases existed during humankind’s hunter-gatherer days, but the shift to agrarian life 10,000 years ago created communities that made epidemics more possible. Malaria, tuberculosis, leprosy, influenza, smallpox, and others first appeared during this period.

The more civilized humans became, building cities and forging trade routes to connect with other cities, and waging wars with them, the more likely pandemics became. See a timeline below of pandemics that, in ravaging human populations, changed history.

2
Health and Food / Coronavirus (COVID-19) Status, 10 March 2020
« on: March 11, 2020, 06:15:23 PM »

CORONAVIRUS AND THE WORLD
   
Region: Asia     

China, Confirmed cases 80879, Deaths 3139

South Korea, Confirmed cases 7513, Deaths 54

Iran, Confirmed cases 7161, Deaths 237

Japan, Confirmed cases 514, Deaths 9

Singapore, Confirmed cases 160, Deaths 0

Malaysia, Confirmed cases 117, Deaths 0

Bahrain, Confirmed cases 109, Deaths 0

Kuwait, Confirmed cases 65, Deaths 0

Iraq, Confirmed cases 61, Deaths 6

United Arab Emirates, Confirmed cases 59, Deaths 0

Thailand, Confirmed cases 50, Deaths 1

Taiwan, Confirmed cases 45, Deaths 1

India, Confirmed cases 44, Deaths 0

Lebanon, Confirmed cases 41, Deaths 0

Israel, Confirmed cases 39, Deaths 0

Philippines, Confirmed cases 35, Deaths   1

Vietnam, Confirmed cases 31, Deaths 0

Palestine, Confirmed cases 20, Deaths 0

Qatar, Confirmed cases 18, Deaths 0

Oman, Confirmed cases 18, Deaths 0

Pakistan, Confirmed cases 16, Deaths 0

Saudi Arabia Confirmed cases 15, Deaths   0

Indonesia, Confirmed cases 6, Deaths 0

Maldives, Confirmed cases 4, Deaths 0

Afghanistan, Confirmed cases 4, Deaths 0

Bangladesh, Confirmed cases 3, Deaths 0

Cambodia, Confirmed cases 2, Deaths 0

Brunei Darussalam, Confirmed cases 1, Deaths 0

Jordan, Confirmed cases 1, Deaths 0

Mongolia, Confirmed cases 1, Deaths 0

Bhutan, Confirmed cases 1, Deaths 0

Nepal, Confirmed cases 1, Deaths 0

Sri Lanka, Confirmed cases 1, Deaths 0

3
World Daily News / How close are we to a pandemic?
« on: February 25, 2020, 10:48:28 PM »

Coronavirus outbreak

Analysis: How close are we to a pandemic?

By James Gallagher
Health and science correspondent

25 February 2020

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REUTERS
San Fiorano is one of the Italian towns on lockdown


Major outbreaks of the new coronavirus have suddenly been detected in both Italy and Iran in the past few days.

Meanwhile, cases in South Korea have surged making it one of the worst-affected countries.

The new coronavirus is no longer a problem just in China, with a small number of exported cases.

It has many people asking if the virus is about to become a pandemic and whether containing it is still possible?

A pandemic is a disease that is spreading in multiple countries around the world at the same time.

This virus "absolutely" has pandemic potential, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) chief Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus.

But he added: "We are not witnessing uncontained global spread of the virus, using the word pandemic does not fit the facts."

Not everyone agrees.

4
How To Tips / Anger Management
« on: February 13, 2020, 01:47:42 AM »

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5

OPINION
06 February 2020

Judge Andrew Napolitano: Despite his impeachment trial acquittal, Trump clearly guilty of a high crime

By Judge Andrew P. Napolitano | Creators Syndicate

"The party told you to reject the evidence of your eyes and ears. It was their final, most essential command." – George Orwell, "1984"

The Senate impeachment trial of President Trump ended not with a bang but a whimper. What different outcome could one expect from a trial without so much as a single witness, a single document, any cross-examination or a defendant respectful enough to show up?

Law students are taught early on that a trial is not a grudge match or an ordeal; it is a search for the truth. Trial lawyers know that cross-examination is the most effective truth-testing tool available to them.

But the search for the truth requires witnesses, and when the command from Senate Republican leaders came down that there shall be no witnesses, the truth-telling mission of Trump's trial was radically transformed into a steamroller of political power.

6
Photos Unlimited / Dog Protected Against Coronavirus
« on: February 05, 2020, 05:19:01 AM »

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POOCH PROTECTION A dog wears a paper cup on its nose on a street in Beijing. In virus-hit Wuhan, pet owners unable to return to their homes are appealing to strangers via social media to ensure left-behind animals are looked after. —AFP

https://newsinfo.inquirer.net/

7
History / 10 of the Worst Pandemics in History
« on: February 03, 2020, 03:56:56 PM »

OUTBREAK: 10 OF THE WORST PANDEMICS IN HISTORY

BY STAFF

Scientists and medical researchers have for years have differed over the exact definition of a pandemic (is it a pandemic, or an epidemic), but one thing everyone agrees on is that the word describes the widespread occurrence of disease, in excess of what might normally be expected in a geographical region.

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Cholera, bubonic plague, smallpox, and influenza are some of the most brutal killers in human history. And outbreaks of these diseases across international borders, are properly defined as pandemic, especially smallpox, which throughout history, has killed between 300-500 million people in its 12,000-year existence.

A final note: The most recent outbreak of the Ebola virus, which has killed thousands of people, is still confined to West Africa. It may someday be pandemic, but for now, it is considered an epidemic — and is therefore not included on this list.

8
Health and Food / How to Prepare for a Coronavirus Pandemic
« on: February 01, 2020, 06:12:21 PM »

How to Prepare for a Coronavirus Pandemic

The Worst-Case Scenario Isn’t Inevitable, But It Can’t Be Ignored

By Tom Inglesby
January 31, 2020

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A police officer at a roadblock in Jiujiang, China, January 2020
Thomas Peter / Reuters

When the first reports of a coronavirus outbreak hit the airwaves in early January, several dozen people had already caught the disease in or around the Chinese city of Wuhan. In the weeks since, the virus, nCoV, has spread quickly and the number of infections has grown by the day, even as Wuhan and other Chinese cities isolated large numbers of patients and quarantined some 50 million residents. At the latest count (as of Friday morning), there have been 213 deaths in China out of a total of 9,776 confirmed cases, and the virus has spread to more than 20 countries. On Thursday, the World Health Organization (WHO) declared the disease a “Public Health Emergency of International Concern.”

The epidemic is still in its early days, and its defining characteristics will take time to understand. The scale of nCoV’s ultimate impact will depend on just how contagious it reveals itself to be and how lethal it is in those who fall ill—properties that cannot be precisely determined at this stage. The efforts underway to contain the disease in China and elsewhere could prove effective in the weeks ahead, and they should be fully supported. Yet there is a clear possibility that nCoV may not be contained in time to prevent a large global outbreak. Countries should start preparing for that prospect now.

9
Health and Food / Of Coronaviruses and Pandemics
« on: February 01, 2020, 02:34:56 PM »

What is a coronavirus?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are known to cause illness ranging from the common cold to more severe diseases such as Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS).

10
Health and Food / 10 Healthy Foods To Avoid Eating When You're Sick
« on: January 29, 2020, 03:21:07 AM »

10 Healthy Foods To Avoid Eating When You're Sick

Whether you have a cold, a headache or a stomachache, these are the ingredients to avoid (and what to eat instead).

By Krissy Brady
01/28/2020

When your sniffles and scratchy throat turn into a full-blown bodily fluid extravaganza, one thing’s for sure: Feeling sick sucks.

But you know the drill. Drink plenty of fluids. Add ginger to the menu when nausea strikes. Get as many nutrients into your body as you can, even if they’re only in liquid form at first. And once you finally work your way back to solid foods again, make sure they’re not processed or sugary. Easy peasy, right?

Well, not so much. There are some otherwise healthy foods that have a reputation for making an already sick person feel worse because they exacerbate or prolong symptoms in some way.

Which healthy foods are the biggest offenders, and what should you eat instead? Read on to find out, but keep one caveat in mind: Everyone reacts to foods differently, even when sick.

If there’s a food (or several) that made this list, yet don’t bother you when you’re sick, then listen to your body and keep enjoying them.

11
Science and Research / Ten women in science you should know
« on: January 28, 2020, 03:17:54 PM »

The heroines STEM: Ten women in science you should know


By Lauren Kent, CNN
January 27, 2020

(CNN)Science is often considered a male-dominated field.

In fact, according to United Nations data, less than 30% of scientific researchers worldwide are women.

Studies have shown that women are discouraged from, or become less interested in, entering the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) beginning at a young age. And according to the Pew Research Center, women remain underrepresented in engineering, computer science, and physical science.

But despite challenges of gender discrimination and lack of recognition in the scientific community, countless inspiring women in these fields have made historic contributions to science and helped advance understanding of the world around us. Many were not recognized in their own lifetimes, but their achievements have helped generations of female scientists to come.

We all learned about Marie Curie and Jane Goodall, but here are 10 more women in science you should know.

12

Your waist size may be more important than weight for multiple heart attack risk

By Katie Hunt, CNN

January 21, 2020

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(CNN)Heart attack survivors who carry extra weight around their belly are at greater risk of another heart attack, new research has found, another reason why measuring your waist may be more important than stepping on the scale.

It's been known for a while that having a pot belly, even if you are slim elsewhere, increases the odds of having a first heart attack, but the latest study, which published Monday in the European Journal of Preventative Cardiology, is the first time researchers have found a link between belly fat and the risk of a subsequent heart attack or stroke.

The link was particularly strong in men, researchers said.

"Abdominal obesity not only increases your risk for a first heart attack or stroke, but also the risk for recurrent events after the first misfortune," said Dr. Hanieh Mohammadi of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, in a news release.

13
Learn English Online / Selenophile
« on: January 21, 2020, 04:16:19 PM »

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14

The most commonly used word in English might only have three letters – but it packs a punch.

By Hélène Schumacher
10 January 2020

‘The’. It’s omnipresent; we can’t imagine English without it. But it’s not much to look at. It isn’t descriptive, evocative or inspiring. Technically, it’s meaningless. And yet this bland and innocuous-seeming word could be one of the most potent in the English language.

‘The’ tops the league tables of most frequently used words in English, accounting for 5% of every 100 words used. “‘The’ really is miles above everything else,” says Jonathan Culpeper, professor of linguistics at Lancaster University. But why is this? The answer is two-fold, according to the BBC Radio 4 programme Word of Mouth. George Zipf, a 20th-Century US linguist and philologist, expounded the principle of least effort. He predicted that short and simple words would be the most frequent – and he was right.

The second reason is that ‘the’ lies at the heart of English grammar, having a function rather than a meaning. Words are split into two categories: expressions with a semantic meaning and functional words like ‘the’, ‘to’, ‘for’, with a job to do. ‘The’ can function in multiple ways. This is typical, explains Gary Thoms, assistant professor in linguistics at New York University: “a super high-usage word will often develop a real flexibility”, with different subtle uses that make it hard to define. Helping us understand what is being referred to, ‘the’ makes sense of nouns as a subject or an object. So even someone with a rudimentary grasp of English can tell the difference between ‘I ate an apple’ and ‘I ate the apple’.

15

The killing of Iran's top general won't stop a war. The US and Iran have already been fighting for more than 40 years

Opinion by Michael Ware

Michael Ware is a former Time magazine and CNN correspondent who was based in Baghdad from 2003 to 2009.

(CNN)US President Donald Trump says he ordered the assassination on Friday of Iran's top general, Qasem Soleimani, "to stop a war." But that's simply not true.

Rather than stop a war, Trump just called Tehran's bluff and wagered all in with the single most daring American act in a conflict that's been raging for years.

No American president has ever taken the fight to Tehran like this. It's bold. It's provocative.

And it could set the Middle East aflame -- but it is most definitely not stopping a war.

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The coffins containing Qasem Soleimani and others killed in the US drone strike are carried in the city of Mashhad, Iran on Sunday.

16
General Topic / Don't abbreviate 2020. It's for your own good
« on: January 06, 2020, 12:40:54 PM »

Don't abbreviate 2020. It's for your own good

By Harmeet Kaur, CNN
January 4, 2020

(CNN)2020 is finally here, and it's coming with its own set of challenges.

Not only do we have to break the habit of writing 2019, when we really mean 2020, but the dawn of a new decade also creates a unique opportunity for scammers, says Ira Rheingold, executive director for the National Association of Consumer Advocates.

How exactly, you ask?

17
Science and Research / The best space images of 2019
« on: December 30, 2019, 06:11:52 PM »

The best space images of 2019

By Paul Rincon
Science editor, BBC News website
30 December 2019

With some blockbuster space missions underway, 2019 saw some amazing images beamed back to Earth from around the Solar System. Meanwhile, some of our most powerful telescopes were trained on the Universe's most fascinating targets. Here are a few of the best.

Up in the clouds

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Image copyright NASA/JPL-CALTECH/SWRI/MSSS/KEVIN M. GILL

Nasa's Juno spacecraft has been sending back stunning images of Jupiter's clouds since it arrived in orbit around the giant planet in 2016. This amazing, color-enhanced view shows patterns that look like they were created by paper marbling. The picture was compiled from four separate images taken by the spacecraft on 29 May.

At the time, Juno was making a close pass of the fifth world from the Sun, approaching to between 18,600km (11,600 miles) and 8,600km (5,400 miles) of the swirling cloud tops.

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KEVIN MCGILL/NASA/JPL-CALTECH/SWRI/MSSS

The image above shows swirling clouds that surround a circular feature within a jet stream region on Jupiter.

18
Health and Food / Fasting might help you live longer
« on: December 26, 2019, 06:38:53 PM »

Eating in a 6-hour window and fasting for 18 hours might help you live longer

By Scottie Andrew, CNN
December 25, 2019

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(CNN) Abstaining from food for 16 to 18 hours a day could be key to treating a variety of health conditions -- even if you've got to train yourself to push past the hunger.

A review of past animal and human studies in The New England Journal of Medicine suggests that intermittent fasting can reduce blood pressure, aid in weight loss and improve longevity.

The report functions as a road map of sorts for physicians to prescribe fasting as a method of prevention or treatment for obesity, cancer, diabetes and heart disease.

19
Photos Unlimited / Tribute to animals lost in WWI
« on: December 22, 2019, 12:11:37 PM »

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A rare photo of World War I soldiers paying tribute to 8 million horses, mules, and donkeys lost in World War I.

20

Rosmah Mansor vs Imelda Marcos: Who spent more?

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Ms Rosmah Mansor (left), the wife of former Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak, and former Philippine First Lady Imelda Marcos.

28 JUNE, 2018

PETALING JAYA — After the reveal of the value of luxury items seized in police raids on properties linked to former Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak, as part of the probe into state investment firm 1Malaysia Development Berhad, comparisons to former Philippines president Ferdinand Marcos and his wife Imelda Marcos were inevitable.

In the 1980s, during the Marcoses two-decade rule, they made headlines for corruption and kleptocracy scandals, similar to the current controversies surrounding former Malaysian prime minister Najib Razak and his wife Rosmah Mansor.

Former Philippine First Lady Imelda Marcos was known for her colossal shoe collection and opulent spending, which eventually led to her and her husband's exile.

The Malaysian authorities said the total market value of luxury watches, jewellery, high-end handbags, and cash recently seized at properties linked to Datuk Seri Najib amounted to a jaw-dropping RM1.1 billion (S$372 million).

The jewellery alone was worth between RM660 million to RM880 million.

Which "First Lady" and her husband spent more? Find out in the face-off below.

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