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Author Topic: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic  (Read 4902 times)

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #40 on: June 30, 2013, 03:23:02 PM »
1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic



I am not sure why some put their Chinese seal beside their signatures. Maybe it was an indication that they were not yet “Filipino” citizens. Fernando Reyes no longer had a seal.





A question could be asked, where are now the descendants of these Chinese residents of Tagbilaran? For example, the first to establish a movie house in Tagbilaran was a Chinese by the name of “Lee.” I no longer hear of any “Lee” in Bohol. How many of them returned to China or Hong Kong?

Reference: Varias Provincias: Bohol. 1861-1896. B-112 SDS-3839. National Archives. Pp. s-309-s-310b.

1. Yes, you're right. In my grandfather's immigration letter, he signs it using Chinese calligraphy and the seal. Mr. Tirol, in the Chinese culture, one's identity and familial name is important. If they were not forced to adopt Spanish names as per the anti-Sangley laws that the spaniards enacted throughout the Philippines, the Chinese immigrants would have not selected spanish first names.


2. The reason why for the disapearance of some Chinese surnames was because of the anti-sangly laws that forced many Chinese to adopt Spanish last names. Some changed their last names for spanish ones, however, a significant number did not. My great grand father, for example, refused to change his last name and kept it, which was TAN.




Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #41 on: June 30, 2013, 03:30:20 PM »
Isles,

There was another brother of Lolo Mariano, the middle brother, who did not stay in Bohol, but went on to move in Cebu. My Lola Babing told me that Lolo Mariano and his other brother were very close as well. This other brother ( his name i forget, and i wish i had asked my lola babing for his name!) worked in the Chinese Consulate Office and was highly educated. From my lola babing's words, "ang igsoon ni Papa , na dato kaajo didto sa Cebu!"

Apparently he became very wealthy in Cebu and with other Chinese community in Cebu. He tried persuading my Lolo Mariano to move to Cebu as well, however, Lolo did not move. He fell in love with Valencia. :)

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #42 on: June 30, 2013, 03:32:47 PM »
Isles,

There was another brother of Lolo Mariano, the middle brother, who did not stay in Bohol, but went on to move in Cebu. My Lola Babing told me that Lolo Mariano and his other brother were very close as well. This other brother ( his name i forget, and i wish i had asked my lola babing for his name!) worked in the Chinese Consulate Office and was highly educated. From my lola babing's words, "ang igsoon ni Papa , na dato kaajo didto sa Cebu!"

Apparently he became very wealthy in Cebu and with other Chinese community in Cebu. He tried persuading my Lolo Mariano to move to Cebu as well, however, Lolo did not move. He fell in love with Valencia. :)

Sometimes I wonder why Lolo Mariano chose to stay in Valencia?

I think I got the answer back in 2010. When i was walking around Valencia, i also walked up to barangay manga, and saw the beautiful mountains and hills of Valencia's interior. The setting is so green, vast, fertile ! Perhaps, just perhaps, the area reminded him of his home village in Conghua, which is also so very hilly and mountainous with rice land interspersed in between.

???

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #43 on: June 30, 2013, 03:44:41 PM »
i've been studying your posts on your tan lineage from china in valencia.  that our branch of the family had descended from the tans who came from china, there's no doubt.  my information though is not as clear as yours.  so far, what i know is that we are descendants of a tan, one of 4 or 5 brothers who came to valencia from china, had a family in valencia, and had gone back to china later.  it's very much like your own story though i'm not as lucky as you who got to know the name of your specific ancestor.

He he he!

Our Tan relations were very fond of going back and forth from Bohol to China. Lolo's brother in Cebu frequented kono traveling from China to Philippines to visit his parents. My Lolo even brought his family back to China for 4 years to see his parents. Its interesting that you say that your ancestors also went to visit China as well. Do you know if he ever came back to Valencia or did he stay there?

Isles, you also have to know that apparently the father of Lolo Mariano kept in touch / contact with his sons who were in the Philippines. The bond was so strong that they would write frequently. So strong that his sons would visit their father and mother...later in life when they were successful.

Do you know when your grandfather went back to China? Did he stay there? Did he ever come back?

islander

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #44 on: June 30, 2013, 04:45:49 PM »
my understanding is that my great grandfather who came to valencia and went back to china never came back to the philippines.  sadly, he left behind his filipino wife and children.  whether it was deliberate or not, i have yet to countercheck.

thanks for your great details, lorenz.  they're very helpful. 
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hubag bohol

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #45 on: June 30, 2013, 07:58:13 PM »
Bohol already had contact with other civilizations even before the discovery of the Philippines. This was evident in the remains of people found in Anda Peninsula indicating the use of gold, jewelry and death masks, buried their dead in wood coffins and “enhanced” their women’s appearance by flattening and shaping their skulls.

Trade between Chinese began in as early as 5th Century, bringing wares and porcelain goods for their return to their mainland. Boholanos served as distributors, taking the Chinese goods as far as the Moluccas to barter with honey, spices and other items. This practice made Boholanos reasonably stable than other islands. -- http://www.camperspoint.com/History-of-Bohol
...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

hubag bohol

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #46 on: June 30, 2013, 07:59:30 PM »
Hmm, tinuod ba kaha ni...
...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #47 on: June 30, 2013, 11:14:19 PM »
my understanding is that my great grandfather who came to valencia and went back to china never came back to the philippines.  sadly, he left behind his filipino wife and children.  whether it was deliberate or not, i have yet to countercheck.

thanks for your great details, lorenz.  they're very helpful. 

Do you know when your great grandfather went back to China? Perhaps it wasn't deliberate, but an unfortunate circumstance. Isles, back in the late 1920's, Lolo brought with him not only his Filipina wife, but all 4 of his children back to Conghua, China. They lived there kono for 4 years! With the intent to live there--permanently. He brought with him his wife (my great-grandmother), Mrs. Gabina Ignalan Tan, and their 4 children: Fortunata Tan (My maternal grandmother), Ceciliano Tan, Balbina Tan and Juliano Tan. According to my grand aunt, Lola Gabina was totally homesick there in China. She was always crying to Lolo and asking him that she did not want to live and die in China..for fear of never seeing her family in Valencia again. During this time, the children were practically raised in China and were assimilated in the village where Lolo grew up in. Na luoy si Lolo Mariano ni Lola Gabina and because he loved his wife so much, he agreed. He took with him his wife and his 4 children back to Valencia so that his wife would not be homesick. According to my lola babing, the day they left China, my great great grandfather, my great great grandmother, great great grand aunts and great great grand uncles, cousins went with them to the port in Guangzhou to see them off. Lola Babing told me that it was the last time Lolo Mariano would see his mama and papa ever again. At that time, tigulang na kono sila. They were particularly close to the grandchildren, since they practically helped raise them.

In 1933 or 1934, Lolo Mariano, Lola Gabina, and their four little children left Guangzhou for the last time.

Back in 2010, the former Mayor of Valencia, Dr. Plinio Lim, who was very good friends with my late grandmother, Mrs. Fortunata Tan - Salvo, told me that he remembered one time when Lolo Mariano did come back to Bohol in the early 1930's, my grandmother already had forgotten how to speak Bisaya na kono, mang ininchik ra kono siya..hahaha! They were childhood friends, so they used to make fun of the children kono because all 4 of them were quite particularly weak in Bisaya, but fluent only in Cantonese ! They eventually learned their mother's native tongue.

I asked Dr. Plinio Lim about my great grandfather, asked him if he remembered how he was like. He said that from his memory kono, Lolo Mariano frequented the market place to sell his goods. He described him as, "he used to mix bisaya with chinese words". Another was that "imong lolo, taas kaayo, almost 6 footer at that time. Seryoso kaayo imong lolo." hahaha!

Now, as to your great grandfather, perhaps he left Valencia with my lolo mariano back in the 1920s. Perhaps he left later. You have to also take into consideration that in the late 1930s, the Japanese invaded China and they were especially destructive in the souther part of China. Forcing a great many Chinese who lived in the cities of Guangzhou, Macao to flee into the mountains to evade attrocities. During the inter-war years, regularly shopping to and from china and the philippines were affected. Perhaps, your great grand father circumstances was not deliberate to leave his family in Valencia, but forced upon him.

Isles, if it brings any solace to you. Your lolo would most probably have returned to Conghua to live with our great-great grandparents. As they were very close to their children and grand children.

In the case of not coming back, another distant relative, Ricky Caluen, has a grandfather, Oyong Tan Piko, went back in the 1940s and never came back. This was during the time of the Great Cultural Revolution in China. So his inability to come back was not due to his own choice, but because of the great social upheaval in their homeland at the time...

Please, isles, share what you know about your great-grandfather here. I will ask my Uncle Romeo, Auntie Celeste, Uncle Jun, Uncle Alex and my Mommy more questions about Lola Nating's side.


Sincerely Yours,
Bran Lorenz
(Apo sa sungay ni Tan Ngai He)
;)

islander

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #48 on: June 30, 2013, 11:47:34 PM »
very interesting.  thanks, lorenz.  i'm getting at this slowly.  it's because i seem to be living these past characters in my mind. 

what i can glean so far is that your lolo sa sungay (or tuhod or siko?), chose to stay in valencia and hold on to his family name.  ours went back to china and never came back, deliberately or not, by force of circumstance or not, and chose to change his name to spanish.  but tan was used as the middle name by his children (one of whom was our grandfather) instead of his wife's family name.

i hope my little knowledge of those yesteryears hews close to the truth.  there is always the danger of addition and subtraction, of subjective-objective correlatives, with oral stories passed down from generation to generation.  meantime, i'll keep checking and counterchecking.  this is getting more interesting.  and you're helping me a lot.
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Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #49 on: July 04, 2013, 11:29:43 PM »
very interesting.  thanks, lorenz.  i'm getting at this slowly.  it's because i seem to be living these past characters in my mind. 

what i can glean so far is that your lolo sa sungay (or tuhod or siko?), chose to stay in valencia and hold on to his family name.  ours went back to china and never came back, deliberately or not, by force of circumstance or not, and chose to change his name to spanish.  but tan was used as the middle name by his children (one of whom was our grandfather) instead of his wife's family name.

i hope my little knowledge of those yesteryears hews close to the truth.  there is always the danger of addition and subtraction, of subjective-objective correlatives, with oral stories passed down from generation to generation.  meantime, i'll keep checking and counterchecking.  this is getting more interesting.  and you're helping me a lot.

Hi Tita,

I commend you on your noble task in uncovering more truth to your family lineage. At first, Tita, it will seem overwhelming and almost impossible, but through constant geneology research, you can find out more. I will recommend that if you go back to Valencia, the best place to find out demographic information will be at Santo Nino Parish Church, where they preserve records of marriages, baptisms, confirmation and funerary rites. It was at Santo Nino Church where I found the exact date my great-grandfather was married to my great-grandmother, the baptismal dates of their children. It is interesting, really, how the church had information on the marriage date of my great-grandparents, my grand parents, my parents, all the way to my baptismal date (i was baptised in valencia). We tend to appreciate the religious, ceremonial, and spiritual aspect of the Church, however, we should take into consideration the Church's unwavering position as a repository for historical data.

The more you go along in your research the more you will feel a bond, an appreciation for your ancestors who sacrificed a lot to come to the country. The answers that flood your mind continue to provide qualitative motivation on your research journey.

I would suggest you document everything you find, through a microblog, through a journal, or even this website. By doing this, you share with you and allow past, and possible relatives to find one another. I documented my information here, and through Tubag Bohol, I found a distant relative, Ricky Caluen, whose great-grandfather was a cousin of mine. And now, Tita, it seems that you might be a relative of mine. Your grandfather was more than likely the cousin of my grandmother. Your great-grandfather was probably the younger brother of my great-grand father.

There is a saying in Chinese, "blood will find blood". Perhaps it holds true in our situation.

God Bless and May God guide you in your noble task.


With Regards,
Sincerely,
Bran Lorenz

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #50 on: July 04, 2013, 11:38:12 PM »
a picture of my Tan Family:


Pictured with my grandmother, Mrs. Fortunata Tan Salvo, and grandfather, Mr. Casiano Salise Salvo Sr., are their grandchildren: (from left to right) Joseph, Fatima Baforlyn, Christian Grace, Lorraine Angeli and Albrando Lorenzo.

The blood line of the Tan Clan of Guangdong, China...runs in our veins. ;D

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #51 on: July 04, 2013, 11:43:51 PM »

My Lolo Ciano, Papa Romeo (my uncle) and Lola Nating, and Lola Berting ( she's my grandfather's younger sister and pictured behind my grandmother)
;D

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #52 on: July 04, 2013, 11:46:51 PM »

My grandmother pictured holding my younger cousin Christian Grace. She's sitting with her friends and family members of my grandfather's side. ;D

My darling Lola's beautiful smile can light a whole room... 8)

hubag bohol

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #53 on: July 06, 2013, 12:59:50 PM »
In those days, being Chinese was looked down upon. Many native Filipinos used to hold a racist and prejudiced outlook towards the Chinese. For being so successful.

Now a days, it's reverse, (here in chinese soil) thou they deny it, you can feel it.

Most likely it's because the Chinese in the Philippines now are rich and can afford to look down on native Filipinos. Naa man gani roy mga klarong Pinoy nga di klarong dato nga makamenos sa mga pobre...
...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #54 on: July 20, 2013, 09:18:53 PM »
very interesting.  thanks, lorenz.  i'm getting at this slowly.  it's because i seem to be living these past characters in my mind. 

what i can glean so far is that your lolo sa sungay (or tuhod or siko?), chose to stay in valencia and hold on to his family name.  ours went back to china and never came back, deliberately or not, by force of circumstance or not, and chose to change his name to spanish.  but tan was used as the middle name by his children (one of whom was our grandfather) instead of his wife's family name.

i hope my little knowledge of those yesteryears hews close to the truth.  there is always the danger of addition and subtraction, of subjective-objective correlatives, with oral stories passed down from generation to generation.  meantime, i'll keep checking and counterchecking.  this is getting more interesting.  and you're helping me a lot.

Tita,

Do share your discoveries on your family lineage in this thread. Thank You.

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #55 on: July 21, 2013, 10:46:48 PM »
The History of the Surname TAN

Two origins have been suggested for the Tan surname:

1. The surname came from the ancient State of Tan which was located in the western part of what is now Shandong Province. During the Spring and Autumn Period, this state was conquered by the neighbouring State of Qi. The court changed their surname to Tan in remembrance of their defeated homeland, and later prospered in Hunan Province.

2. The surname came from the less common surname 談, another with the same pronunciation in Mandarin and Cantonese. In order to avoid the revenge of their enemies, the clan leaders changed it to 譚.

A study by geneticist Yuan Yida has found that people with either of the two Tan surnames are especially concentrated in Hunan Province, and surrounding provinces which would tend to support these accounts. This does not mean that they are the most common surnames in that province.


Reference: Wikipedia



Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #56 on: July 21, 2013, 10:48:18 PM »
The Calligraphy of the Surname Tan:

               

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #57 on: July 21, 2013, 10:51:22 PM »
Individuals with the Tan Bloodline claim lineage to the Ancient Chinese State of Tan, which was established 1046 BCE, 1000 years before the birth of Jesus Christ. The surname is over 3,059 years old.

Talk about Ancient Bloodline. ;D

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #58 on: July 21, 2013, 10:52:27 PM »
Individuals with the Tan Bloodline claim lineage to the Ancient Chinese State of Tan, which was established 1046 BCE, 1000 years before the birth of Jesus Christ. The surname is over 3,059 years old.

Talk about Ancient Bloodline. ;D

Amazing noh?

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #59 on: July 21, 2013, 10:57:48 PM »
History of the Ancient Chinese State of Tan



Foundation:
n 1046 BCE, Zhou, the last king of the Shang Dynasty, was defeated at the Battle of Muye by King Wu, founder of the Zhou Dynasty. Following this victory, he founded a number of small subordinate vassal states  to be ruled by his brothers and generals. One of these was the State of Tan, which was located just east of present-day Jinan, the capital of the present-day Shandong Province. The Tan rulers, who were reputed to be descendants of Yu the Great (the legendary ancient king and founder of the Xia Dynasty), were given the then-new heredity title of zijue (tzu-chueh (子爵), viscount).


Demise:
In February 684 BCE, when rulers of neighboring states went to congratulate Duke Huan of Qi, ruler of the neighboring State of Qi, on defeating the State of Lu and the State of Song, Xian Li, the ruler of Tan did not go.

In October later that year, the Qi ruler used this discourtesy as an excuse to attack Xian Li and his three brothers. After ten days, his siege was successful, and the Tan ruler fled with 200 members of the royal family to the State of Ju, where his son, Qi Yi (祁義), was the ruler. Qi Yi was the first to change his clan name to Tan in memory of defeated state.


The Ancient State of Tan, an ally of the state of Zhou.


Reference: Wiki



 

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