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1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
By Jes Tirol
The Bohol Chronicle

Proem
During the Spanish era in the Philippines, the Chinese were prohibited in many aspects of society.  They were allowed only to engage in commerce and trades and crafts.  Despite the many prohibitions many Chinese managed to become rich in the Philippines.

Many Chinese in Tagbilaran, Bohol managed to become rich.  They eventually become part of the body politic in Bohol.

Esteban Butalid, the progenitor of the Butalid Clan in Bohol was a Chinese by the name of Kiozon.  He was the contractor of the construction of the Bohol Capitol Building in 1855.  Many Chinese obtained a Christian name when they were baptized and became Christians.  They intermarried into the community and could no longer be distinguished from the native residents, however, there where those who tried to retain their Chinese identity.

Petition for Governor’s Retention

In 1879, Governor Adolfo Martin de Baños was first assigned in Bohol.  He was able to have a good rapport with the people of Bohol.  When he was ordered to be reassigned to another place, the people of Bohol made a petition to the Governor General of the Philippines that Governor Baños be retained.  Among those who made a separate petition were the Chinese in Tagbilaran, Bohol.
The main argument in the petition were: a.) Previous Governors of Bohol had a tour of duty from six (6) to eight years.  Governor Baños was still one and one-half years in office; it is still too early for him to be reassigned.  b.) He was very active in the construction of school houses and the schoolteacher’s residence.  c.) He was widening the roads to six (6) yards in width. He ought to be retained to finish his projects.  d.) He was very active in the application of the quintos (draft for military service).

The Chinese Petitioners

The petition made by the Chinese residents in Tagbilaran on May 10, 1880 were signed and sealed by them.  However, some signatures are difficult to read.  As far as I can decipher, the signatories of the petition were: 1. Jose Palma Penga.  2. Fernando Reyes. 3. Yu Un Lao. 4. Co-Tiangco. 5. Tan Sun Co. 6. Pelemeno Lim. 7. Cua Ciu Jannes. 8. Ygnacio Sanchangco. 9. Victoriano Herrera. 10. Uy Tiao Yong. 11. Uy-Suico. 12. Antonio So Climaco. 13. Fernando Climaco. 14. Fernando Elisaga. 15. Yap Con Te. 16. Tan Sianco. 17. Jose Reyes Lim Sangco.

Notable among the signatories was Fernando Reyes. It was at his house where the Boholanos planned how to fight against invading Americans. He was popularly known as Insik Ina Uy. Before he married Micaela Dalmao of Tagbilaran, he was baptized as a Roman Catholic. His godfather was Alfredo Reyes, a son of Governor Bernabe Reyes who was the leader of the Boholano Republic. Insik Ina took a Christian name Fernando and the family name “Reyes” from his godfather.

Some Observations

I am not sure why some put their Chinese seal beside their signatures. Maybe it was an indication that they were not yet “Filipino” citizens. Fernando Reyes no longer had a seal.

Fernando Elisaga, Yap Con Te, Tan Sianco, and Jose Reyes Lim Sangco did not have signatures or rubrics but wrote their names in the Chinese characters. It was an indication that they were educated Chinese before they came to Bohol.

In my opinion, the reason why some Chinese became rich was that they were already well educated in China before they came to Bohol. They may not speak Spanish or Bisaya but their brains were already well developed. They were actually mentally superior to the Boholanos during that time.

A question could be asked, where are now the descendants of these Chinese residents of Tagbilaran? For example, the first to establish a movie house in Tagbilaran was a Chinese by the name of “Lee.” I no longer hear of any “Lee” in Bohol. How many of them returned to China or Hong Kong?

Reference: Varias Provincias: Bohol. 1861-1896. B-112 SDS-3839. National Archives. Pp. s-309-s-310b.
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Ricky Caluen

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This is a very interesting topic---the role the Chinese played in Bohol politics and society.  I am particularly interested in this discussion because my roots are also Chinese. In fact, I have been trying to connect with any member of any Tan family in Bohol.

My greatgrandfather was named Tan Pico.  His baptismal name was Ruperto Tan-Roa (as explained earlier, Roa was his native sponsor's name).  He is believed to have migrated to Guindulman sometime in the 1880s. According to family lore, he came when he was only in his early teens, together possibly with other brothers and cousins of the same surname.  They came by way of Leyte.

My Oyong (I suppose this is some Chinese rendering of "lolo") returned to China in 1947/48, at the height of the Chinese revolution.  Presumably, he returned to Amoy.  My late uncle, Arce Roa (who used to own Roa's store at the Jagna pier), was a teenager when he accompanied Oyong to China.  Unfortunately, no one bothered to document things about our Chinese ancestor, until I started doing research on the subject, mainly because of my own specialization in History.

Ruperto Tan-Roa, a.k.a Tan Pico, married Rufina Basa Bernaldez of Guindulman. I have the genealogy of the Basa side of my family but only until Jose Basa, my Oyang's grandfather.  I have been trying to establish the direct connection between my greatgreatgreatgrandfather Jose Basa with the noted Propagandist, his namesake, Jose Maria Basa of Cavite.

I am also interested in getting a reference to someone who has done research on the Philippine revolutionary and Fil-American war periods in Bohol.  My other greatgrandfather, Fernando Salise (Valencia, Bohol), is believed to have been the youngest revolutionary to surrender to the Americans (presumably at least in the Valencia area).

My limitation is that I live in Toronto (Canada).

Any help would be appreciated.

Ricky

Lorenzo

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This is a very interesting topic---the role the Chinese played in Bohol politics and society.  I am particularly interested in this discussion because my roots are also Chinese. In fact, I have been trying to connect with any member of any Tan family in Bohol.

My greatgrandfather was named Tan Pico.  His baptismal name was Ruperto Tan-Roa (as explained earlier, Roa was his native sponsor's name).  He is believed to have migrated to Guindulman sometime in the 1880s. According to family lore, he came when he was only in his early teens, together possibly with other brothers and cousins of the same surname.  They came by way of Leyte.

My Oyong (I suppose this is some Chinese rendering of "lolo") returned to China in 1947/48, at the height of the Chinese revolution.  Presumably, he returned to Amoy.  My late uncle, Arce Roa (who used to own Roa's store at the Jagna pier), was a teenager when he accompanied Oyong to China.  Unfortunately, no one bothered to document things about our Chinese ancestor, until I started doing research on the subject, mainly because of my own specialization in History.

Ruperto Tan-Roa, a.k.a Tan Pico, married Rufina Basa Bernaldez of Guindulman. I have the genealogy of the Basa side of my family but only until Jose Basa, my Oyang's grandfather.  I have been trying to establish the direct connection between my greatgreatgreatgrandfather Jose Basa with the noted Propagandist, his namesake, Jose Maria Basa of Cavite.

I am also interested in getting a reference to someone who has done research on the Philippine revolutionary and Fil-American war periods in Bohol.  My other greatgrandfather, Fernando Salise (Valencia, Bohol), is believed to have been the youngest revolutionary to surrender to the Americans (presumably at least in the Valencia area).

My limitation is that I live in Toronto (Canada).

Any help would be appreciated.

Ricky

Good Evening Ricky,

I couldn't help but read your response and was brought to interest due to the familial ties we have, though distant, I am sure.

My mother's grandfather, was known as Mr. Mariano Tan (his Chinese full name was: Tan Ngai) and came to Bohol by way of Jolo, as he smuggled into the Philippines with his other brothers---to whose name, my memory alludes me.
My great Grandfather, Mr. Mariano Tan (Tan Ngai) did end up marrying a Spanish Mestiza, Senorita. Gabina Ignalan; and after marrying my great grandmother, did have 4 Children: Fortunata Tan (my maternal grandmother), Cecilio, Balbina, and Juliano.
When my grandmother was alive, as well as my grand-aunt--Lola Babing (Balbina), told me that my great grandfather used to take my grandmother and my grand-uncle (Cecilio) back to Guangzhong, China. As they had alot of relatives there; it was so intense that my grandmother knew how to speak and write in Cantonese--Chinese. hehe. Though we have lost contact our other Tan relatives, I knew that my great grandfather did have brothers and cousins that he came with to Bohol. :)

So I read your testimony that your relative settled in Guindulman. Who was also another Tan.

My great grandfather did settle in Philippines in the early 20th century; from the documents we have--he arrived in Philippines in 1909.


===


I also notice that you are related to Mr. Fernando Salise. hehe, that brought attention to my eyes, because I am also part of the Salise Clan.
My great grandmother of my mother side (my mother's paternal grandmother was: Mrs. Donisia Salise-Salvo). And my maternal side hails from Valencia, particularly in Barangay Anas.

In regards to my maternal side: I hail from the Tan, Salise, Salvo Clan.
hehe


I hope you get this message.


With Warm Regards,
Mr. Albrando Lorenzo Salvo Lucino Jr.

Lorenzo

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What is also very interesting, Ricky, is that my grand-uncle, Cecilio Tan, went to school and was educated in China for college. He was several years younger than my grandmother, Mrs. Fortunata Tan-Salvo, but due to the Old Chinese Confucian culture, even though my grandmother was the oldest child, Lolo Cecilio was sent to China for school because he was the male child. (Oldest male child).

I learned about this by word of mouth from my late Lola Babing (Balbina Tan).

My grandmother knew not only how to speak Bisaya, Tagalog, but even Cantonese, Chinese and English. As she was also part of the Guerilla Resistance in World War II. :)

===

I remember my Lola Babing telling me that my great grandfather---Lolo Mariano Tan, who used to speak in thick Chinese accent. Even when he spoke in Bisaya, he still had a very beautifully distinct Chinese accent. And his beauty was pure Chinese. hehe, well of course, because he was 100% pure Han Chinese. hehe. I admire so much that though he came to Philippines and married a non-Chinese, he still made it possible and taught his children the Chinese culture, and the Chinese Language (Cantonese).

In those days, being Chinese was looked down upon. Many native Filipinos used to hold a racist and prejudiced outlook towards the Chinese. For being so successful. What is interesting--is that the reason why the Chines succeeded in Philippines was because of the old and ancient Confucian Work Ethic. The Confucian Culture of saving money, hard work, and STRONG Familial Piety. Respect for Father, Mother.

My Lola Babing told me that many people in Bohol, in the past, used to look down and have prejudiced look toward Chinese. But my Great Grandfather, Lolo Mariano told his children to be proud of being part Chinese. So much that he took them to China on occasion, and made sure that they learned Cantonese; not just Bisaya.

I really admire that. About the Chinese-Filipinos. That though there were laws that were set in place to prevent them from assimilating into the Spanish-Filipino Society, they nonetheless made it happen. They rose from the setbacks, and have progressed and contributed greatly to the Philippines by means of economics, culture, and even ethnic-racial gene spreading. hehe.


Remember your roots. :)

ZecurB

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You can't blame the Chinese for succeeding since not only do they have those good qualities but the Chinese, are one of the ancient civilizations that provided the world the most crucial technological innovations which other ancient civilizations have ever surpassed...   

nilamaw

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In those days, being Chinese was looked down upon. Many native Filipinos used to hold a racist and prejudiced outlook towards the Chinese. For being so successful.

Now a days, it's reverse, (here in chinese soil) thou they deny it, you can feel it.
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Ricky Caluen

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FURTHER ON THE TAN'S OF BOHOL

Hi, Lorenzo. Sorry for this delayed reply. I actually attempted to respond to your previous posting right after I read it but my lengthy reply got deleted by accident. I hope this doesn't happen again this time. My cursor seems to be jumping all over the place, that's why...and that's when the s*** hits the fan (pardon my French!).

With the indulgence of other readers, I continue to post this reply for public consumption considering that the Tan family could be quite numerous in Bohol.  Hopefully, in so doing, we might just get more related comments .

Now, it is really very intriguing for me to note that you mentioned somewhere that your Lolo Cecilio (or some other ancestor) came to Bohol from Jolo..."smuggled", as you wrote. I am intrigued because my Oyong---Tan Pico--according to my Lolo Jorge (Salise) was known to have brought to the country (or to Bohol perhaps at least?) many of his relatives. It is presumed that my Lolo Ruperto (called Insik Perto in Guindulman) first arrived in Manila. But from there Oyong said his batch of relatives proceeded to Leyte, and from there to Bohol. Some proceeded to Jolo (quite contrary to the migration pattern originating from Jolo and ending in Bohol).  There is no doubt that Lolo Perto had direct Tan relatives there because it was a relative from Jolo who encouraged him to return to China in 1948.

And before I forget, the only other cousin of my Oyong whom I met when I was a kid was named Shoga (or possibly spelled Sioga).  I remember meeting her in the mid-60s in Jagna where she married Catalino Uy (possibly a pure Chinese himself). Lola Shoga dressed in cheongsam and made small steps when walking because she had the pang-ko or bound feet. For all her years in Bohol, she still spoke with a thick Chinese accent, calling my Mom "Calalita", when her name is Clarita.  :)
 
My branch of the Tan family is sad to note that the last child of our Oyong Perto, Rosario "Sayong" Tan-Tubig of Tabajan, Guindulman, passed away today, July 21st. She was 91. Unfortunately, I never had a chance to her about our roots when I used to visit the Philippines and when she still had full control of her faculties.

You are lucky to still possess your  ancestors'  immigration papers. I wonder if you could scan these for me, just to have sense of what information is contained in those travel documents.

All for now.  Will comment on the Salise family next time.

Cheers,

Ricky

Lorenzo

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Dear Ricky,

I just read your reply. I would scan you a copy, however, I am far from home, am in medical school right now and am miles away from home.

As for relatives, we have a growing Tan family in my maternal side. When my Lola Babing (Balbina Tan) was alive, she did tell me that back in the 1940s, Lolo Mariano (My Chinese Great-Grandfather) took my grandmother and my grand-uncles to China (Guangzhao Region) to visit relatives over there.

And I do know that my side of the Tan Family were Han Chinese since they hailed from Guangzhao (the ancestral root of the Tang Dynasty), and since my Lolo Mariano's native tongue was Cantonese Chinese.

I want to someday reunite with some of my Chinese relatives (Tan Side) in Guangzhou. I want to find out more about them, since they are an entire chapter of my own identity and my family's identity that I want to get to know.

One cannot help but to know more about one's history. I have an entire chapter of my family that remains 'Blank'. I want to know more about my Chinese ancestral side. I want to visit the graves of my Chinese great great great grandparents. to see where that side of my lineage and progeny come from.

:)


Thanks for the conversation. I wish you luck in your search as well.

God Speed.

All the best,
Lorenzo

Ricky Caluen

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The Tans of Valencia
« Reply #8 on: July 26, 2009, 07:44:01 PM »
Hi, Lorenzo.  What a small world indeed. I visited my Mom at the nursing home yesterday and asked her if she has heard of a Mariano Tan. Guess what....without a moment's hesitation...she immediately said "yes". She said Mariano Tan was my Oyong's (Tan Pico, a.k.a. Ruperto Tan) cousin.  Interestingly enough, a few days ago....she was telling me of an incident involving a certain Juliano Tan. She said Mariano was Juliano's father. She added yesterday that my Oyong himself told her that Mariano was his cousin. Mommy said Mariano had other children with nicknames of Balbing and Nating (she says Juliano was often called "Yanni"). Mommy says Nating has children in California.

Well, going over the names of your Chinese greatgrandpa's children as you wrote, I notice that the nicknames  above in fact correspond to your grandmother's and grandauntie's and granduncle's names!

Looks like we are in fact related afterall!  Now, I have a bit of tsismis to tell you about Juliano but which, obviously, I can not post here. So, better give me your email address if you want to know what this is :)))))

Further, if Tan Ngai and Tan Pico were close relations (as my Oyong had intimated)....how big do you think is the probability that they came from the same village in Guangzhou? Your family might just be able to help mine finally solve the mystery of our Oyong's circumstances when he returned to China in 1948, like where and when he died, if we are able to trace his direct relations, possibly through your family's help.

Cheers,

Ricky

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #9 on: February 22, 2012, 12:02:53 PM »
Hi, Lorenzo.  What a small world indeed. I visited my Mom at the nursing home yesterday and asked her if she has heard of a Mariano Tan. Guess what....without a moment's hesitation...she immediately said "yes". She said Mariano Tan was my Oyong's (Tan Pico, a.k.a. Ruperto Tan) cousin.  Interestingly enough, a few days ago....she was telling me of an incident involving a certain Juliano Tan. She said Mariano was Juliano's father. She added yesterday that my Oyong himself told her that Mariano was his cousin. Mommy said Mariano had other children with nicknames of Balbing and Nating (she says Juliano was often called "Yanni"). Mommy says Nating has children in California.

Well, going over the names of your Chinese greatgrandpa's children as you wrote, I notice that the nicknames  above in fact correspond to your grandmother's and grandauntie's and granduncle's names!

Looks like we are in fact related afterall!  Now, I have a bit of tsismis to tell you about Juliano but which, obviously, I can not post here. So, better give me your email address if you want to know what this is :)))))

Further, if Tan Ngai and Tan Pico were close relations (as my Oyong had intimated)....how big do you think is the probability that they came from the same village in Guangzhou? Your family might just be able to help mine finally solve the mystery of our Oyong's circumstances when he returned to China in 1948, like where and when he died, if we are able to trace his direct relations, possibly through your family's help.

Cheers,

Ricky

HELLO RICKY ! I just read this now! Long lost distant relative ta, Ricky! :)

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #10 on: February 22, 2012, 12:05:52 PM »
Please tell me about your Lolo Pico, please, because I remember my Lola Nating and Lola Babing (Anak ni sila ni Lolo Mariano; si Lola Nating, ahong lola gajud, mama na siya sa ahong mommy).

I remember Lola Nating and Lola Babing telling me kono nga that Lola Mariano had a lot of relatives who came from CHINA to BOHOL. Lolo Mariano had a brother who went on to Cebu, but he also had 1st degree cousins kono that came to Bohol. Now I know that Pico Tan was his cousins diay!!

I will give this information to my mom and our relatives. Good to see that our TAN CLAN still lives and that the blood line of our ancestors are rekindled. Will forward you my information.

God Bless You, dear Ricky! Cousins man diay ta. :)

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #11 on: February 22, 2012, 12:08:05 PM »
This is a tribute page for my late great-grandfather, Mr. Mariano Tan. Lolo Mariano, who was born in Guangzhou, China, immigrated to the Philippines in 1903 and would call Valencia, Bohol his home as he developed a life and a business in the Philippines.
His full Chinese (HAN) name was: Tan Ngai He. He was the husband of my late great-grandmother, Mrs. Gabina Ingnalan, a Spanish-Filipina mestiza. They would have 4 children and they will be named accordigly from eldest to youngest.

1. Fortunata Tan
2. Ceciliano Tan
3. Balbina Tan
4. Juliano Tan

Their oldest child, and first daughter, anhing Fortunata Tan-Salvo is my maternal grandmother. My Lola Nating.

This summer 2010, I was able, for the first time in my life (as an adult) to visit the grave site of Lolo Mariano and my late Lola Gabina. It was a heart pounding and tearful experience to visit the grave of my Chinese Lolo. To give and offer my homage to his memory, as is the custom, the Chinese custom, of a male Chinese son/grandson before the memory of his grandfather/grandmother. I offered onto his grave fresh flowers, and 24 candles. 12 candles for my Lolo Mariano and 12 candles for my lola Gabina. Each candle symbolized each year that I was unable to visit them. As I sat with them, a gush of cool breeze covered my face, and none of my candles, which were lit, were blown off. The wind touched the flowers I presented in offering for my great-grandparents. I could not help but smile and had this feeling that my Lolo Mariano was there watching me. It was a beautiful experience.


Thanks to the help of my uncle Romeo, I was able, through Grace of God, to see the face of my Lolo Mariano. I have always wanted to see how he looked like, but thought that all his pictures disappeared or were lost in time. It was not the case, apparently so.

My uncle saved a picture of our Lolo, one that was taken when he just arrived in the port of Jolo, Philippines in 1903. This picture was of my Lolo Mariano when he was only 22 years old. If you look closely, his dress attire and his hair cut style is that of the Qing-Dynasty China. It was a standardized by the Qing Emperors that all male Chinese would shave their top hair and keep the back long and tied in a knot. Seeing this picture makes me happy, to see how my Lolo looked like when he was my age, and also to see and reaffirm that I have such a long history, an undiscovered history in Guangzhou, CHINA.


Behold, my Great Grand Father, your Grand Uncle:







Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #12 on: February 22, 2012, 12:11:07 PM »
Dear Ricky,

Please visit the thread that I dedicated to our dear Lolo Mariano.

http://tubagbohol.mikeligalig.com/index.php?topic=35875.0


Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #13 on: February 22, 2012, 12:15:29 PM »
Hi, Lorenzo.  What a small world indeed. I visited my Mom at the nursing home yesterday and asked her if she has heard of a Mariano Tan. Guess what....without a moment's hesitation...she immediately said "yes". She said Mariano Tan was my Oyong's (Tan Pico, a.k.a. Ruperto Tan) cousin.  Interestingly enough, a few days ago....she was telling me of an incident involving a certain Juliano Tan. She said Mariano was Juliano's father. She added yesterday that my Oyong himself told her that Mariano was his cousin. Mommy said Mariano had other children with nicknames of Balbing and Nating (she says Juliano was often called "Yanni"). Mommy says Nating has children in California.

Well, going over the names of your Chinese greatgrandpa's children as you wrote, I notice that the nicknames  above in fact correspond to your grandmother's and grandauntie's and granduncle's names!

Looks like we are in fact related afterall!  Now, I have a bit of tsismis to tell you about Juliano but which, obviously, I can not post here. So, better give me your email address if you want to know what this is :)))))

Further, if Tan Ngai and Tan Pico were close relations (as my Oyong had intimated)....how big do you think is the probability that they came from the same village in Guangzhou? Your family might just be able to help mine finally solve the mystery of our Oyong's circumstances when he returned to China in 1948, like where and when he died, if we are able to trace his direct relations, possibly through your family's help.

Cheers,

Ricky

haha, what a small world indeed. Your mommy is correct ! She even knows my grandmother and my grand aunt ! ha ha ha! kuyawa kaayo that you still retained the information.

Fortunata Tan Salvo (Nating) has 5 children : Romeo, Alex, Celeste, Liza, and Casiano Jr. (I am the child of Liza).

Si Balbina Tan , was my grand aunt, who lived in California since the 1950's. Both my Lola Babing and Lola Nating passed away in the summer of 1998.


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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #14 on: February 22, 2012, 12:25:18 PM »
This is a very interesting topic---the role the Chinese played in Bohol politics and society.  I am particularly interested in this discussion because my roots are also Chinese. In fact, I have been trying to connect with any member of any Tan family in Bohol.

My greatgrandfather was named Tan Pico.  His baptismal name was Ruperto Tan-Roa (as explained earlier, Roa was his native sponsor's name).  He is believed to have migrated to Guindulman sometime in the 1880s. According to family lore, he came when he was only in his early teens, together possibly with other brothers and cousins of the same surname.  They came by way of Leyte.

My Oyong (I suppose this is some Chinese rendering of "lolo") returned to China in 1947/48, at the height of the Chinese revolution.  Presumably, he returned to Amoy.  My late uncle, Arce Roa (who used to own Roa's store at the Jagna pier), was a teenager when he accompanied Oyong to China.  Unfortunately, no one bothered to document things about our Chinese ancestor, until I started doing research on the subject, mainly because of my own specialization in History.

Ruperto Tan-Roa, a.k.a Tan Pico, married Rufina Basa Bernaldez of Guindulman. I have the genealogy of the Basa side of my family but only until Jose Basa, my Oyang's grandfather.  I have been trying to establish the direct connection between my greatgreatgreatgrandfather Jose Basa with the noted Propagandist, his namesake, Jose Maria Basa of Cavite.

I am also interested in getting a reference to someone who has done research on the Philippine revolutionary and Fil-American war periods in Bohol.  My other greatgrandfather, Fernando Salise (Valencia, Bohol), is believed to have been the youngest revolutionary to surrender to the Americans (presumably at least in the Valencia area).

My limitation is that I live in Toronto (Canada).

Any help would be appreciated.

Ricky

Your Oyong is, indeed, a 1st cousin of my Lolo Mariano Tan. Lolo Mariano actually came from a very wealthy family in Guangzhou Province, China. He , like his brothers who followed him, wanted to go abroad to set up business and also to follow the migration patterns of the Chinese into the Philippines. Because during that time, the Philippines, which was a very rich American Colony had recently reversed the Spanish Government's Anti-Chinese Immigration Policy. That is why such a large influx of Chinese came to Philippines during the early 20th century. My great-grandfather was about 22 years of age when he left Guangzhou , CHINA for Jolo and then Bohol in 1903. Literally 2 years after the ending of the Philippine-American War.

You said that your Oyong went back to China during the height of the CHINESE REVOLUTION , I would like to say that during the 1930's, my Great-Grandfather actually brought his Filipina/Spanish wife back to China and with them their 3 children (Fortunata, Ceciliano, Balbina) and lived in Guangzhou for some 4 years before going back to Valencia (the reason why was because my great-grandmother, who was a Spanish-Filipina native of Valencia was severely  homesick, so lolo Mariano left China again) Tho, im happy that the family went back to BOHOL during the time because the Japanese invaded China in the late 1930's.

Do you still have relatives in Jagna and Guindulman, Ricky? I would like to touch base in mapping how many relatives i have in Guindulman and Jagna.

I am still trying to find the old family chart that Lolo Mariano had, which included the names of my great-great grandparents who were town officials in Guangzhou.

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #15 on: February 22, 2012, 12:36:28 PM »
As you notice, Ricky, Lolo Mariano picture illustrates that he has the classic "Queue hair cut", a fashion style of the Chinese men during the 19th and early 20th century. :)

It was the Imperial Chinese style during the time:


they shave the front part of the head and forehead, and keep the back part long.



Si Lolo Mariano with a Queue hair style. Note his shaved head. He was born in 1881, during the Qing Dynasty's Reign...

Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #16 on: February 22, 2012, 12:57:20 PM »
Back in January 1998, my Lola Babing (Mrs. Balbina Tan-Salingay) told me about the time when she was only 4-5 years old. She remembered the time where Lolo Mariano carried a bell to the top of the Valencia Church bell tower all by himself. As he was a friend of the church priest at the time. This was during the late 1920's - early 1930's.

It was really amazing to talk to Lola Babing (the younger sister of my maternal grand mother, Fortunata Tan-Salvo) about the yesteryears. In the time that she stayed with us, I was given information of how Lolo worked, what his personality was like. He was adamant kono that they all know how to speak, and write in Chinese (Cantonese). Sa balay nila, dili kono mo sulti si Lolo Mariano og Bisaya, Cantonese ra gajud.

Naka katawa ko kai it was so hardcore that the kids (Fortunata, Ceciliano, Balbina) would sometimes speak Cantonese when they were at school. Lola Babing told me that when she and my Lola Nating were in Valencia Elementary sa una, the kids would tease them kai inchik sila and inchikon ilang nawong. Not to mention, that they had a Chinese father. I asked Lola Babing why this was--and she explained to me that during the 1920's, 1930's, 1940's etc, the Filipino people looked down on Chinese kono.

Mo hilak daw kono si Lola Nating og si Lola Babing after school kai the local kids would tease them and say things like, 'Baho Inchik', 'Inchik Mata'.

They would cry to their father. Lolo Mariano told them as he dried their eyes, "Do not ever be ashamed of being Chinese. Be proud that you are Chinese. Just ignore them, and continue to study..." The natives of Valencia would tease and pick on my grandmother and my grand aunt for being Chinese. They would also tease my great-grandfather for being "inchik", as the people during that time were very racist towards Chinese people.


Lorenzo

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #17 on: February 22, 2012, 12:57:57 PM »
In the early 1930's, Lolo Mariano took the entire family back with him to Guangzhou, China. When I was talking to my Lola Babing about this , I asked her how the climate was like, how the environment in China was like compared to Bohol. Her response to me was, "Daghan kaayo og tawo didto, Ondoy. Ang mga tawo didto sa village ni Papa, puro sila tanan og TAN. Paryente sila namo."

So i asked her if she was able to see her grandparents, the mother and father of Lolo Mariano. Naka kita siya nila kono. When Lolo Mariano returned to China in the early 1930's, his father was already old, as so was his mother. When Lolo met his father for the first time since he left China in 1903, he kowtowed to his father and mother. Kowtow is the act of bowing / kneeling before the parent in act of reverence and filial piety. It was an ancient Chinese custom.

Lolo introduced his Filipino wife to his parents as well as his children. Strikto kono to ang Papa ni Lolo Mariano, pero ang Mama niya, dali kono to siya mo kogos sa mga bata. The favorite of Lolo Mariano's father was Ceciliano Tan, a boy. Ceciliano Tan was the younger brother of my maternal grandmother, Fortunata Tan.

After 4 years in China, the family returned back to Valencia, Bohol. When I asked Lola Babing why they returned back to Valencia, she cited the main reason was that her mother was becoming really homesick. For the sake of his wife, Mariano Tan, bid a final farewell to his mother and father and extend relatives, and brought his family back to Valencia, Bohol.

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #18 on: February 22, 2012, 12:58:13 PM »
A good family friend, Dr. Plinio Lim, a former Mayor of Valencia, shared some very warm stories with me concerning my great-grandfather, and my grandmother. After I was introduced to Dr. Lim by way of another family friend, Mr. Jan Palaca, I was amazed that Mayor Lim said to me, "Ondoy Bran, kahibalo ba ka sa imong Lolo Mariano?"

I smiled. Of course I knew, however, I was delighted to know more about him from another viewpoint. So I replied, "Oh, pero gamay lang..."

He said to me, as he put his arm on my shoulder, his eyes looking at mine, "Your Lolo Mariano was pure Chinese. You know that? He was from Guangdong. Strikto kaayo to imong Lolo."

Ning katawa ko. I replied back, "Mao ba diay?"

"Oo! Strikto to siya." "Do you know that when your Lola Nating was younger..she was very beautiful? Pure Chinese beauty...Pure Chinese beauty..." hahaha I could not help but smile when he said that.

It was apparent that close diay to ang pamilya ni Dr. Plinio Lim ni Lolo Mariano. In fact, Dr. Guido Lim and Dr. Plinio Lim were close friends with my Lola.

Dr. Plinio Lim shared more stories with me....it is really amazing how much  you learn about your family just by going back to your hometown. Amazing, truly.

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Re: 1880: The Chinese in Tagbilaran Were Already Part of the Body Politic
« Reply #19 on: February 22, 2012, 12:59:10 PM »
Ceciliano Tan.
(the younger brother of my Lola Babing; my Grand Uncle)


According to the words of Lola Babing (Balbina Tan), her brother, Ceciliano, was a prolific academic. He was an intellectual when he studied in Valencia Elementary. He was a top student in the school and a constant honor's student. Since he lived in China for 4 years during the time when Lolo Mariano took the family back to Guangzhou, he actually assimilated into life in China. That is why he actually preferred to speak in his father's language. It was said by my Lola Babing that he and my Lola Nating were the favorites of  Lolo Mariano's parents.

Ceciliano Tan was a polyglot. He was fluent in Cantonese (a southern Chinese dialect), Mandarin (a northern Chinese dialect), in Binisayang Bol-anon, Tagalog, Spanish, and English. He was a prolific writer. Because of my great-grandfather's influence, he was a delicate calligrapher kono and when he would write letters to my Lolo Mariano , he would write not in Filipino, but in Chinese.

Ceciliano Tan applied and was accepted to Zhongshan University, of Guangdong, China. He was a Finance and Business Student. And according to Lola Babing, was also an honors student there as well.

Pinangga to siya kaayo ni Lolo Mariano.


 

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