Author Topic: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?  (Read 14672 times)

hubag bohol

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The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
« on: March 29, 2011, 06:01:51 PM »
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  • Legend of the Ten Bornean Datus


    The Ten Bornean Datus Epic refers to the ten chieftains who allegedly ventured to the Island of Panay boarding a boat called balangay (or barangay) to evade the tyrannical ruler of Borneo, Datu Makatunaw. The datus, believed to be the fathers of precolonial Philippines, were the following: Datu Puti (and wife, Piangpangan), Datu Sumakwel (and wife, Kapinangan), Datu Bangkaya (and wife, Katurong), Datu Paiborong (and wife, Pabilaan), Datu Paduhinogan (and wife, Tibongsapay), Datu Dumangsol, Datu Libay, Datu Dumangsil, Datu Domalogdog, and Datu Balensuela.

    According to the legend, upon the arrival of the datus, the local inhabitants of the islands, the Aeta, grew terrified but the diplomatic Datu Puti said to Marikudo, the chief of the natives, that they had peaceful intentions. Later both parties entered into a trade alliance. Marikudo invited the datus to a feast, during which the ten chiefs negotiated the purchase of Panay Island for a golden salakot. Since the Aetas found the land overwhelmingly vast for them, they retreated to the forest, leaving the Datus with the land which they divided among themselves (namely Aklan, Irong Irong and Hamtik), leading to the birth of Philippine population and culture.

    However, recent studies discovered the irregularities of the said legend, and thus, it must not be believed as a reliable source of facts on precolonial Philippines.

    But still, these studies are contested, though history per se is limited to "written" historical accounts, the legend is is considered "spoken" historical account and part and parcel of Filipino culture. The legend is important part of the life, culture and identity of Ilonggo people and inhabitants of Panay Island. There is no argument that the roots of the word "barangay" came from "balangay" the boat used by the Ten Bornen datus and their families. Until now, the head of the barangay is a "barangay captain" the only head of a government unit in the world named after a captain of a boat.


    http://en.wikipilipinas.org/

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    hubag bohol

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #1 on: March 29, 2011, 06:07:05 PM »
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  • Barter in Panay
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    hubag bohol

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #2 on: March 29, 2011, 06:14:57 PM »
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  • The Ten Bornean Datus and the Purchase of Panay


    The story of the buying of Panay by ten datus coming from Borneo is told in the Maragtas, a legendary account about the pre-Spanish Panay Island. This narrative tells us that about A.D. 1250, at about the time Malaysia and Indonesia were dominated by the Hindu-Malay Empire of Sri-Vijaya, a cruel sultan named Makatunaw ruled Borneo–or perhaps part of it. Because he was cruel, ten of his datus decided to leave Borneo and seek their freedom and fortune beyond the sea.

    The Ten Datus were: Datu Puti (the leader), Datu Balensusa, Datu Bangkaya, Datu Dumalugdog, Datu Dumangsil, Datu Dumangsol, Datu Lubay, Datu Panduhinog, Datu Paliburong, and Datu Sumakwel.

    One dark night after loading on boats their families, warriors, slaves, and supplies, they secretly left in their balangays (boats) without a specific destination in mind. After sailing north for many days, they reached the southern tip of Panay Island. They landed at the mouth of the Sirwagan River there, near the present town of San Joaquin in Iloilo. From there they proceeded to Lake Andona where they met an Ati fisherman. This man led them to the Negrito village of Sinugbuhan and was introduced to the local ruler, King Marikudo and his queen, Maniwantiwan. Datu Puti addressed them and said they came as friends and would like to buy land.

    Marikudo consulted his wife and the elders of his kingdom and agreed to sell some land to them. The purchase price consisted of a gold salakot (a native helmet) for Marikudo and a long gold sumangyad (necklace) for Maniwantiwan. The sale was sealed by a pact of friendship and merry feasting. After that, Marikudo and his people bade farewell to the Borneans and went into the hills.

    Seven of the ten datus settled in Panay. The three others–Balensusa, Dumangsil and Puti sailed farther north and reached Lake Taal, in present-day Batangas province. Impressed by the fertility and scenic beauty of the area, Balensusa and Dumangsil settled there. Datu Puti, however, returned to Borneo. He told the Borneans about his exciting adventures in the islands of the north.


    http://www.philippinealmanac.com/
    ...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

    hubag bohol

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #3 on: March 29, 2011, 06:18:57 PM »
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  • The misconceptions surrounding Maragtas were further reinforced when even the highly respected historian, Dr. Henry Otley Beyer called it "a prehispanic document." In Philippine Saga which he wrote with Jaime C. de Veyra in 1947, he mentioned a manuscript from Panay known as Maragtas and “the ancient writing in which it was originally inscribed". Then in his Outline Review of Philippine Archaeology of 1949 he wrote the following:" A remarkable ancient document known as the “Maragtas,” dating probably from about 1225, was preserved in Panay and transliterated into romanized Visayan in the early Spanish days."


    More at: http://writingthirty.blogspot.com/2005/05/inquirer-and-those-bornean-datus.html
    ...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

    hubag bohol

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #4 on: March 29, 2011, 06:23:18 PM »
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  • Binirayan Festival





    The Binirayan Festival was first witnessed on January 11-13, 1974, organized by Governor Evelio B. Javier in an effort to revisit the past and relive the province’s noble heritage. In this way, Evelio Javier believed the Antiqueño could gain confidence in charting his future.

    After many years, the festival has evolved into one of the longest-running cultural festivals in the country, touted by many as the first original cultural festival in the region. Although the Binirayan takes its grand narrative from the Maragtas legends, which highlight the coming and settling of the Bornean datu in Malandog, Hamtic, the present day celebrations has integrated the other indigenous people in Antique like the Ati, the Bukidnon, and the lowland communities to show the diversity of Antiqueño heritage. It also takes pride in its Chinese and Hispanic heritage, as well as the diaspora of Antiqueños all over the world, represented by the layas nga Antiqueños.


    http://www.binirayanfoundation.org/
    ...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

    hubag bohol

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #5 on: March 30, 2011, 01:45:25 AM »
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  • ...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

    hubag bohol

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #6 on: March 30, 2011, 01:54:14 AM »
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  • The Code of Kalantiaw was a mythical legal code in the epic story Maragtas. It is said to have been written in 1433 by Datu Kalantiaw, a chief on the island of Negros in the Philippines. It was actually written in 1913 by Jose E. Marco as a part of his historical fiction Las antiguas leyendas de la Isla de Negros (Spanish, "The Ancient Legends of the Island of Negros"), which he attributed to a priest named Jose Maria Pavon.

    In 1917, the historian Josué Soncuya wrote about the Code of Kalantiaw in his book Historia Prehispana de Filipinas ("Prehispanic History of the Philippines") where he moved the location of the Code's origin from Negros to the Panay province of Aklan because he suspected that it may be related to the Ati-atihan festival. Other authors throughout the 20th century gave credence to the story and the code.

    In 1965, then University of Santo Tomas doctoral candidate William Henry Scott began an examination of prehispanic sources for the study of Philippine history. Scott eventually demonstrated that the code was a forgery committed by Marco. When Scott presented these conclusions in his doctoral dissertation, defended on 16 June 1968 before a panel of eminent Filipino historians which included Teodoro Agoncillo, Horacio de la Costa, Marcelino Foronda, Mercedes Grau Santamaria, Nicolas Zafra and Gregorio Zaide, not a single question was raised about the chapter which he had called The Contributions of Jose E. Marco to Philippine historiography. Scott later published his findings debunking the code in his book Prehispanic Source Materials for the Study of Philippine History. Filipino historians later removed the code from future literature regarding Philippine history.


    More at: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Code_of_Kalantiaw
    ...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

    Lorenzo

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #7 on: April 02, 2011, 11:47:32 PM »
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  • Interesting. The Visayan port of entry is Panay Island diay. So that would make the Hiligaynon/Ilonggo dialect of Visaya as the original Visayan language?

    :P

    hubag bohol

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #8 on: April 04, 2011, 05:55:33 PM »
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  •  ;D
    ...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

    Lorenzo

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #9 on: April 04, 2011, 06:03:30 PM »
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  • funny. i was thinking of that today.


    islander

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #10 on: September 08, 2015, 11:56:31 AM »
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  • Filipino historians later removed the code from future literature regarding Philippine history.

    glad. even the names of the datus and their wives sound invented. no wonder datu puti is now a brand of commercial vinegar. strange too that they have to go to panay when mindanao is nearer borneo, and bigger.
    Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

    hubag bohol

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #11 on: September 13, 2015, 05:30:38 AM »
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  • glad. even the names of the datus and their wives sound invented. no wonder datu puti is now a brand of commercial vinegar. strange too that they have to go to panay when mindanao is nearer borneo, and bigger.

    Basin ang taga Panay ray nakahunahuna og imbento sa estorya. Tikalon lang gid haw... :P
    ...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

    islander

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #12 on: September 13, 2015, 09:58:14 AM »
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  • Basin ang taga Panay ray nakahunahuna og imbento sa estorya. Tikalon lang gid haw... :P


    uh-huh...

    But still, these studies are contested, though History per se is limited to "written" historical accounts, the legend is considered "spoken" historical account and part and parcel of Filipino Culture. The legend is an important part of the life, culture and identity of Ilonggo people and inhabitants of Panay Island.

    (from http://en.wikipilipinas.org/index.php/Legend_of_the_Ten_Bornean_Datus)
    Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

    hubag bohol

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    Re: The Ten Bornean Datus: History or Legend?
    « Reply #13 on: September 13, 2015, 10:08:42 PM »
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  • uh-huh...

    But still, these studies are contested, though History per se is limited to "written" historical accounts, the legend is considered "spoken" historical account and part and parcel of Filipino Culture. The legend is an important part of the life, culture and identity of Ilonggo people and inhabitants of Panay Island.

    (from http://en.wikipilipinas.org/index.php/Legend_of_the_Ten_Bornean_Datus)


    Indeed...



    ...than to speak out and remove all doubt." - Abraham Lincoln

     

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