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Author Topic: Hoaxes, like the hoax that made Cebuanos run, are not rare  (Read 945 times)

islander

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Hoaxes, like the hoax that made Cebuanos run, are not rare
« on: February 07, 2012, 09:48:42 AM »
hoaxes, those tricks that make one "believe or accept as genuine something false and often preposterous", have been around, and not just for cebuanos.  some famous hoaxes in history have even tenaciously clung in the world's collective memory.  some samples:

Crop Circles

 
The phenomenon of those large circles of flattened crops mysteriously appearing in fields goes back to the 1970s, in Southern England. Soon it spread all over the world, with crop circles reported as far away as Australia, America and Japan. Various explanations were given, such as aliens, ball lightning and large-scale unregistered hootenannies.


Thousands of these crop circles were reported over the decades, gaining a massive following among UFO enthusiasts who worked tirelessly to try to decipher what was clearly messages from another world. After all, the perfect patterns could clearly not be replicated by, say, a couple of dumbasses in their spare time.


We're sure the ufology community's faces were red when, in 1991, pranksters Doug Bower and Dave Chorley from Southampton, England confessed to creating the original circles. They even demonstrated to journalists how they produced the perfect shapes by flattening them in the crops using planks and ropes, and crude surveying techniques.

The confession was prompted when Bower's wife noticed unexplained high mileage on his car and began to suspect him of having an affair, though Cracked feels that after learning the truth--that Bower was actually going out at night with another man to flatten hectares of wheat--she may actually have wished that adultery was to blame.

And Yet...

Bower and Chorley found themselves widely ignored. After all, they didn't confess to doing all the crop circles, right? Maybe they just started the prank and then real aliens came and joined in.

Feverish study of the circles continued unabated, and M. Night Shyamalan even featured them in Signs, more than a decade later.

Read more: 5 Myths That People Don't Realize Are Admitted Hoaxes | Cracked.com http://www.cracked.com/
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

islander

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Re: Hoaxes, like the hoax that made Cebuanos run, are not rare
« Reply #1 on: February 07, 2012, 09:59:52 AM »
The Surgeon's Photograph of the Loch Ness Monster



This famous picture, which shows what looks like the head of a prehistoric creature emerging from the waves of Scotland's Loch Ness, was allegedly snapped by gynecologist Robert Wilson in 1934. It soon became known as the "surgeon's photograph," because searching for "gynecologist's photograph" on Google Images will absolutely not result in finding this picture.

Before Dr. Vagina's famous photo, the Loch Ness Monster had been limited to a few legends and scattered local sightings, which presumably accompanied spottings of highland prostitutes and grain alcohol. After the surgeon's photo, however, the creature gained worldwide attention, despite the fact that Wilson himself denied the Loch Ness Monster even existed and insisted he had just taken a picture of some animal he didn't recognize.


"Ooh, an animal I don't recognize! Good thing I don't believe in monsters or I would be shitting all over myself right now."

Monster sightings and photographs continued unabated in the area for the next 60 years until 1994, when a man named Christian Spurling finally confessed to the hoax. Spurling explained that his father-in-law Marmaduke Wetherall had staged the picture using a fake monster head attached to an 18-inch long toy submarine.

The whole ridiculous plan was an attempt to get back at his employer, a newspaper called the Daily Mail that had ridiculed him in a recent issue. Wetherall had Dr. Wilson submit the picture to give it more "respectability."


The original uncropped image, which is clearly a prehistoric beast and not a duck or a bathtub toy.

And Yet...

So that's the end of the Loch Ness Monster, right?

Not even close. Die-hard cryptozoologists immediately dismissed Spurling's hoax confession, insisting the resources that he described being used to make the fake monster didn't exist in 1934 (fake monster heads would apparently not be invented until much later).

To this day, the Loch Ness Monster industry is thriving, and every few years there's a new, expensive expedition setting out to find it. There was a 2003 BBC special that employed satellites and 600 separate sonar beams to try to track down the beast once and for all.

So Why Do They Still Believe?

The fact that there are "cryptozoologists" in the world (that is, people who specialize in tracking legendary creatures to prove they're real) should tell you. There are people who have staked their reputations on the creature being real and depend on the income from books asserting such. It's not so easy for somebody in that position to give in to the "wooden head glued to a toy submarine" theory.


Latest photograph of the monster.

If there were only some way to walk away from the theory and save face at the same time... oh, wait. Some Loch Ness Monster experts say the creature has probably now died. Due to global warming.

We should also point out that Loch Ness is located in an area where the other main attractions involve grim industrial sprawl and a dish made of ground sheep's heart, so they're going to promote the hell out of any mythical creature they can get their hands on. Scotland would probably be claiming Highlander as a true story if they thought they could get away with it.

Read more: 5 Myths That People Don't Realize Are Admitted Hoaxes | Cracked.com http://www.cracked.com/
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

islander

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Re: Hoaxes, like the hoax that made Cebuanos run, are not rare
« Reply #2 on: February 07, 2012, 10:07:16 AM »
Alien Autopsy



In 1995, Ray Santilli instigated a wide reaching “alien autopsy” controversy when he claimed to possess footage taken in a tent by a U.S. military shortly after the 1947 Roswell UFO incident.  Santilli first presented his film to an invited audience of media representatives, UFOlogists and other dignitaries at the Museum of London on 5 May 1995.  Although the broadcast version did not show the actual “autopsy”, video editions have the complete and unedited film, plus previously unreleased footage of wreckage presented as the remains of the alien craft reported to have crashed in Roswell.  The show features interviews with experts on the authenticity of the film.

On April 4, 2006, two days prior to the UK release of Alien Autopsy Ray Santilli and fellow producer Gary Shoefield announced that their film was only partially real (a “few frames,” in their words), while the rest was a reconstruction of twenty-two rolls of film, averaging four minutes in length, which Santilli had viewed in 1992 but which had subsequently degraded from humidity and heat.  According to Santilli, a set was constructed in the living room of an empty flat in Rochester Square, Camden Town, London.  John Humphreys, an artist and sculptor, was employed to construct two dummy alien bodies over a period of three weeks, using casts containing sheep brains set in jelly, chicken entrails and knuckle joints.

http://listverse.com/
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

islander

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Re: Hoaxes, like the hoax that made Cebuanos run, are not rare
« Reply #3 on: February 07, 2012, 10:10:51 AM »
Feejee Mermaid



The Feejee Mermaid was presented as a mummified body of something, supposedly a creature that was half mammal and half fish (like a grotesque version of normal mermaid stories).  The original exhibit was popularized by circus great P.T. Barnum, but has since been copied many times in other attractions, including the collection of famed showman Robert Ripley.  The original exhibit was shown around the United States, but was lost in the 1860s when Barnum’s museum caught fire.  The exhibit has since been acquired by Harvard University’s Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology and is currently housed in the museum’s attic storage area.

The Fiji mermaid came into Barnum’s possession via his Boston counterpart Moses Kimball, who brought it down to Barnum in late spring of 1842.  On June 18, Barnum and Kimball entered into a written agreement to exploit this “curiosity supposed to be a mermaid.”  Kimball would remain the creature’s sole owner and Barnum would lease it for $12.50 a week.  Barnum christened his artefact “The Feejee Mermaid”.

In reality, the mermaid was a gaff, the work of an Indonesian craftsman using either papier-mâché and materials from exotic fish, or the tail of a fish and a torso of a baby orangutan, stitched together with the head of a monkey.

http://listverse.com/
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

islander

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Re: Hoaxes, like the hoax that made Cebuanos run, are not rare
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2012, 10:14:48 AM »
The Cardiff Giant



The Cardiff Giant, one of the most famous hoaxes in American history, was a 10-foot-tall (3m) “petrified man” uncovered on October 16, 1869 by workers digging a well behind the barn of William C. “Stub” Newell in Cardiff, New York.  Both it and an unauthorized copy made by P.T. Barnum are still on display.  The Giant was the creation of a New York tobacconist named George Hull.  Hull, an atheist, decided to create the giant after an argument with a fundamentalist minister named Mr. Turk about a passage in Genesis that stated that there were giants who once lived on earth.

Hull hired men to carve out a 10-feet-long, 4.5 inches block of gypsum in Fort Dodge, Iowa, telling them it was intended for a monument of Abraham Lincoln in New York.  He shipped the block to Chicago, where he hired a German stonecutter to carve it into the likeness of a man and swore him to secrecy.  Various stains and acids were used to make the giant appear to be old and weather beaten, and the giant’s surface was beaten with steel knitting needles embedded in a board to simulate pores.  When the giant had been buried for a year, Newell hired two men, Gideon Emmons and Henry Nichols, ostensibly to dig a well.  When they found the Giant, one of them has been attributed to saying “I declare, some old Indian has been buried here!”.

The giant drew such crowds that showman P.T. Barnum offered $60,000 for a three-month lease of it (in his memoirs he said he wanted to buy it).  When the syndicate turned him down he hired a man to covertly model the giant’s shape in wax and create a plaster replica.  He put his giant on display in New York, claiming that his was the real giant and the Cardiff Giant was a fake.  On February 2, 1870 both giants were revealed as fakes in court.  The judge ruled that Barnum could not be sued for calling a fake giant a fake.

http://listverse.com/
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

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Re: Hoaxes, like the hoax that made Cebuanos run, are not rare
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2012, 10:14:48 AM »

islander

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Re: Hoaxes, like the hoax that made Cebuanos run, are not rare
« Reply #5 on: February 07, 2012, 10:19:02 AM »
The Protocols of the Elders of Zion



The Protocol of the Elders of Zion is a text that purports to describe a Jewish and Masonic plot to achieve world domination.  It is one of the most well known and discussed examples of literary forgery.  Numerous independent investigations have concluded it to be either a plagiarism or a hoax.  The Protocols is widely considered to be the beginning of contemporary conspiracy theory literature, and takes the form of an instruction manual to a new member of the “elders,” describing how they will run the world through control of the media and finance, and replace the traditional social order with one based on mass manipulation.

Continued usage of the Protocols as an antisemitic propaganda tool substantially diminished with the defeat of the Nazis in World War II.  It is still frequently quoted and reprinted by some anti-Semitic circles, and is sometimes used as evidence of an alleged Jewish cabal, especially in the Middle East.  Elements of the text in the Protocols appears to be plagiarized from an 1864 pamphlet, Dialogue in Hell Between Machiavelli and Montesquieu, written by the French satirist Maurice Joly. Joly’s work attacks the political ambitions of Napoleon III using Machiavelli as a diabolical plotter in Hell as a stand-in for Napoleon’s views.

Interestingly, many of the protocols aims have been achieved.  For example: Universal suffrage, wide acceptance of pornography, the spread of Darwinism, Socialism, and Materialism.

http://listverse.com/
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

islander

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Re: Hoaxes, like the hoax that made Cebuanos run, are not rare
« Reply #6 on: February 07, 2012, 10:31:32 AM »
Racial hoax causes PR headache for McDonald’s

By Zachary Roth | The Lookout – Mon, Jun 13, 2011



An online hoax that falsely suggests McDonald's discriminates against African-American customers is causing a PR headache for the Golden Arches.

Over the weekend, the photograph above circulated widely on the internet.  The image shows what looks like an official McDonald's notice in the window of a restaurant, telling customers that blacks will be charged $1.50 extra "as an insurance measure due in part to a recent string of robberies."

Many internet users retweeted the photo, using the words "Seriously McDonald's," to express their disapproval of the burger chain.

In response, McDonald's sent a tweet of its own on Saturday: "That pic is a senseless & ignorant hoax McD's values ALL our customers. Diversity runs deep in our culture on both sides of the counter."

But that clearly wasn't enough to clear things up, because Twitter users continued to send out the picture, with that same message of condemnation: "Seriously McDonald's." Indeed, so many people sent "Seriously McDonald's" Tweets that the phrase became a leading entry on Twitter's trend list.

That led to a second, blunter McTweet, on Sunday: "That Seriously McDonalds picture is a hoax."

The latest pushback effort seems to have helped keep the photo from spreading too much further--but there's no telling how many people out there still think the photo is for real.

This is hardly the only recent barrage of negative publicity for the burger behemoth--some of it more justified.  McDonalds CEO Jim Skinner recently was forced to defend the company's renewed use of the Ronald McDonald mascot to appeal to children, after critics said the restaurant's fat-laden burgers and fries endanger kids' health.

It's not clear who created the hoax image.  It appears to have first showed up on the popular 4chan message board, and it was posted last year on an anti-McDonald's blog.

But there's no doubt it's fake.  As some Twitter users have pointed out, the toll-free number given at the bottom of the sign is actually the number for ... Kentucky Fried Chicken.

http://news.yahoo.com/
Republic Act 8485 (Animal Welfare Act of 1998, Philippines), as amended and strengthened by House  Bill 6893 of 2013--- violation means a maximum of P250,000 fine with a corresponding three-year jail term and a minimum of P30,000 fine and six months imprisonment

 


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