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Author Topic: Tan Ancestry  (Read 8774 times)

raldampong

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #20 on: May 17, 2011, 11:10:07 PM »
Doc Bran, the best source is the book of life sa Simbahan sa Catholic Dong, naa tanan gi bunyagan diha makita kon kiinsa imong inahan ug amahan.
Mid pleasures and palaces thought we may roam. Be it ever so humble, there's no place like home.

                                                      John H. Payneh


Lorenzo

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #21 on: May 19, 2011, 12:09:59 AM »
Kamusta na Doc Bran, are doing your residency now. Sayang Dong wala ko kahibalo nga niuli ka diay sa ato. Nagkita diay unta ta last year.

My daughter Camille is already a Dentist. She has a clinic already in Quezon City.

Tan family Dong is big Clan in Guindulman. I've been to Guanzhu, Shanghai and Shenzhen, Dong in Guangdong Province.

Hi Sir Rald,

Kamusta and regards to your daughter! Ug mo uli ko sa Pinas, mo stop by ko sa ijang office sa Quezon City ha. Mag schedule ko og dental exam. :)

I am finishing up the requirements of my dual M.D-Ph.D program, Sir Rald.

I will try to access the Catholic Church's registry documents the next time that I am in Philippines. I did not even think to look at that as a source for information, a shame really.

Next time, Sir Rald, we should meet up. Sayang wala ta ka meet up sa last year. If you were in Guindulman last summer, then you probably saw me driving around your beautiful town. I frequented Guindulman last year. Duol duol ra man gud sa Valencia ;)


Regards!


Lorenzo

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #22 on: May 20, 2011, 10:54:09 AM »
Taas kono to si Lolo Mariano. My Lola Babing (Mrs. Balbina Tan- Salingay; my grand aunt) told me that Lolo Mariano was over 6 foot kono.

He was the one that carried the bell in Valencia's bell tower; all by himself. Isug kono to sija sa una.

Luoy pood si Lolo kai he had to  leave China for Philippines kai sa una, very poor daw kaayo ang Chinese didto sa ilahang bayan.

It saddens me to think that Lolo had to say good bye to his mother and father because of the desperate times.

I can only imagine how my great-great grand mother and my great great grand father looked like...

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Ricky Caluen

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Re: Tan Ancestry (My Guindulman Connection)
« Reply #23 on: February 22, 2012, 12:23:04 PM »
I'm very glad to come across postings re the origins of the Tan family in Bohol as my greatgrandfather was one of the Tan  "originals" in the province. Based on the narrative written by my late grandfather (Jorge Salise, Sr of Valencia...who married Concepcion Tan of Guindulman), my greatgrandfather was believed to have arrived in Bohol around the mid-1870s. His name is Tan Pico, later baptized as Ruperto Tan-Roa. He settled in Tabajan, Guindulman where the folks at the time called him Insik Perto. It looks like my Oyong Perto had first come and then left the Philippines another time to fetch his brothers and cousins. These Tan relations had scattered to parts of Southern Leyte, different towns in Bohol, and as far as Jolo. In fact, it was a relative from Jolo who convinced my Oyong to return to China...which he finally did sometime 1948, on the eve of the Communist takeover in 1949.

Oyong Perto was a small-time gentleman farmer in Guindulman who later sold all his properties after the war...in order to pay for his steerage accommodation when he travelled back to China for the last time. Oyong was married to another Guindulman native, Rufina Basa Bernaldez, whose own roots, particularly on the Basa and Bernaldez side, I am also trying to trace. My Oyang Rufina's mother was Lorenza Basa who was married to Francisco Bernaldez. I am quite intrigued about my Basa origins because Lorenza Basa's father was named Jose Basa and according to my Lolo Jorge Jose Basa was originally from Cavite and was directly related to Jose Ma. Basa, the respected patriot from the said province who figured very prominently in the Propaganda Movement in the latter part of the Spanish administration of the country.

Going back to my Tan relations. When Oyong went back to China in 1948 he was accompanied by my mother's first cousin, Arsenio Roa, who was known to the older folks in Jagna as Arsing or Arce Roa, a very good-looking man who once figured in some Cebuano films in the 1950s.  The family used to own a small carenderia at the Jagna Pier called Roa's Store ( I think). Oyong Perto had a cousin...a female who was called Shoga (or something like that). I remember seeing her for the first and only time when I was child in the late 1960s. Shoga wore a gray cheongsam and had really small but stubby feet --pak-kha. Shoga was married to another Chinese in Jagna by the name of A-be Uy.

We never heard from our Oyong after he left the Philippines in 1948.  It is unfortunate that my Uncle Arsing never kept records or told older family members as to which village in Guangzhou he settled back in.

It would certainly be nice to hear from you, guys, in case we are related one way or the other because of our common Tan ancestry. Oyong and Oyang had 7 daughters and only 1 son. That is why very, very few in my family carried the Tan family name. The only Tan relations left in Tabajan, Guindulman are Maning Tan Tubig and his brother Elpidio. Other relatives in the area are the children and grandchildren of my late uncle, Ondoy Tan Fortich.

I will be going home to the Philippines in May and hope to attend the Tabajan fiesta on May 3rd. It would be nice to meet our Tan relatives :)

Ricky


Lorenzo

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #24 on: February 22, 2012, 12:29:38 PM »
I'm very glad to come across postings re the origins of the Tan family in Bohol as my greatgrandfather was one of the "originals" in the province. Based on the narrative written by my late grandfather (Jorge Salise, Sr of Valencia...who married Concepcion Tan of Guindulman), my greatgrandfather was believed to have arrived in Bohol around the mid-1870s. His name is Tan Pico, later baptized as Ruperto Tan-Roa. He settled in Tabajan, Guindulman. It looks like my Oyong Perto had first come and the left the Philippines to fetch his brothers and cousins. These Tan relations had scattered to parts of Southern Leyte, different towns in Bohol, and as far as Jolo. In fact, it was a relative from Jolo who convinced my Oyong to return to China...which he finally did sometime 1948, on the eve of the Communist takeover in 1949.

Oyong Perto was a small-time gentleman farmer in Guindulman who later sold all his properties after the war...in order to pay for his steerage accommodation when he travelled back to China for the last time. Oyong was married to another Guindulman native, Rufina Basa Bernaldez, whose own roots, particularly on the Basa and Bernaldez side, I am also trying to trace. My Oyang Rufina's mother was Lorenza Basa who was married to Francisco Bernaldez. I am quite intrigued about my Basa origins because Lorenza Basa's father was named Jose Basa and according to my Lolo Jorge Jose Basa was originally from Cavite and was directly related to Jose Ma. Basa, the respected patriot from the said province who figured very prominently in the Propaganda Movement in the latter part of the Spanish administration of the country.

Going back to my Tan relations. When Oyong went back to China in 1948 he was accompanied by my mother's first cousin, Arsenio Roa, who was known to the older folks in Jagna as Arsing or Arce Roa, a very good-looking man who once figured in some Cebuano films in the 1950s.  The family used to own a small carenderia at the Jagna Pier called Roa's Store ( I think). Oyong Perto had a cousin...a female who was called Shoga (or something like that). I remember seeing her for the first and only time when I was child in the late 1960s. Shoga wore a gray cheongsam and had really small but stubby feet --pak-kha. Shoga was married to another Chinese in Jagna by the name of A-be Uy.

We never heard from our Oyong after he left the Philippines in 1948.  It is unfortunate that my Uncle Arsing never kept records or told older family members as to which village in Guangzhou he settled back in.

It would certainly be nice to hear from you, guys, in case we are related one way or the other because of our common Tan ancestry.

Ricky

Ricky,

It seems as if we are related verily much indeed. My great grandfather (father of my mother's mother) was Mr. Mariano Tan (Tan Ngai He), who was one of the ORIGNAL TANs who arrived in Bohol in 1903, and my other great-grandfather (the father of my mother's father) was a Mr. Ricardo Salise Sr. of Valencia.

Can you please post pictures of you ancestors? I would like to see their pictures. Seeing as your relatives are actually mine, also. :)


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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #25 on: February 22, 2012, 02:34:41 PM »
I'm very glad to come across postings re the origins of the Tan family in Bohol as my greatgrandfather was one of the Tan  "originals" in the province. Based on the narrative written by my late grandfather (Jorge Salise, Sr of Valencia...who married Concepcion Tan of Guindulman), my greatgrandfather was believed to have arrived in Bohol around the mid-1870s. His name is Tan Pico, later baptized as Ruperto Tan-Roa. He settled in Tabajan, Guindulman where the folks at the time called him Insik Perto. It looks like my Oyong Perto had first come and then left the Philippines another time to fetch his brothers and cousins. These Tan relations had scattered to parts of Southern Leyte, different towns in Bohol, and as far as Jolo. In fact, it was a relative from Jolo who convinced my Oyong to return to China...which he finally did sometime 1948, on the eve of the Communist takeover in 1949.

Oyong Perto was a small-time gentleman farmer in Guindulman who later sold all his properties after the war...in order to pay for his steerage accommodation when he travelled back to China for the last time. Oyong was married to another Guindulman native, Rufina Basa Bernaldez, whose own roots, particularly on the Basa and Bernaldez side, I am also trying to trace. My Oyang Rufina's mother was Lorenza Basa who was married to Francisco Bernaldez. I am quite intrigued about my Basa origins because Lorenza Basa's father was named Jose Basa and according to my Lolo Jorge Jose Basa was originally from Cavite and was directly related to Jose Ma. Basa, the respected patriot from the said province who figured very prominently in the Propaganda Movement in the latter part of the Spanish administration of the country.

Going back to my Tan relations. When Oyong went back to China in 1948 he was accompanied by my mother's first cousin, Arsenio Roa, who was known to the older folks in Jagna as Arsing or Arce Roa, a very good-looking man who once figured in some Cebuano films in the 1950s.  The family used to own a small carenderia at the Jagna Pier called Roa's Store ( I think). Oyong Perto had a cousin...a female who was called Shoga (or something like that). I remember seeing her for the first and only time when I was child in the late 1960s. Shoga wore a gray cheongsam and had really small but stubby feet --pak-kha. Shoga was married to another Chinese in Jagna by the name of A-be Uy.

We never heard from our Oyong after he left the Philippines in 1948.  It is unfortunate that my Uncle Arsing never kept records or told older family members as to which village in Guangzhou he settled back in.

It would certainly be nice to hear from you, guys, in case we are related one way or the other because of our common Tan ancestry. Oyong and Oyang had 7 daughters and only 1 son. That is why very, very few in my family carried the Tan family name. The only Tan relations left in Tabajan, Guindulman are Maning Tan Tubig and his brother Elpidio. Other relatives in the area are the children and grandchildren of my late uncle, Ondoy Tan Fortich.

I will be going home to the Philippines in May and hope to attend the Tabajan fiesta on May 3rd. It would be nice to meet our Tan relatives :)

Ricky


Ricky,

I remember being told by my Lola Babing that one time sa una, she talked to some relatives in Guindulman (she referred to them as relatives of papa mariano). I am wondering if she was referring to your Lola Conching. I also know that my late grandmother, Fortunata Tan-Salvo, was in open communication with relatives in Guindulman. Sadly, the trace and links ended when she passed away in July 1998.

Best Regards,
Lorenzo

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #26 on: September 04, 2012, 09:31:34 AM »
I'm very glad to come across postings re the origins of the Tan family in Bohol as my greatgrandfather was one of the Tan  "originals" in the province. Based on the narrative written by my late grandfather (Jorge Salise, Sr of Valencia...who married Concepcion Tan of Guindulman), my greatgrandfather was believed to have arrived in Bohol around the mid-1870s. His name is Tan Pico, later baptized as Ruperto Tan-Roa. He settled in Tabajan, Guindulman where the folks at the time called him Insik Perto. It looks like my Oyong Perto had first come and then left the Philippines another time to fetch his brothers and cousins. These Tan relations had scattered to parts of Southern Leyte, different towns in Bohol, and as far as Jolo. In fact, it was a relative from Jolo who convinced my Oyong to return to China...which he finally did sometime 1948, on the eve of the Communist takeover in 1949.

Oyong Perto was a small-time gentleman farmer in Guindulman who later sold all his properties after the war...in order to pay for his steerage accommodation when he travelled back to China for the last time. Oyong was married to another Guindulman native, Rufina Basa Bernaldez, whose own roots, particularly on the Basa and Bernaldez side, I am also trying to trace. My Oyang Rufina's mother was Lorenza Basa who was married to Francisco Bernaldez. I am quite intrigued about my Basa origins because Lorenza Basa's father was named Jose Basa and according to my Lolo Jorge Jose Basa was originally from Cavite and was directly related to Jose Ma. Basa, the respected patriot from the said province who figured very prominently in the Propaganda Movement in the latter part of the Spanish administration of the country.

Going back to my Tan relations. When Oyong went back to China in 1948 he was accompanied by my mother's first cousin, Arsenio Roa, who was known to the older folks in Jagna as Arsing or Arce Roa, a very good-looking man who once figured in some Cebuano films in the 1950s.  The family used to own a small carenderia at the Jagna Pier called Roa's Store ( I think). Oyong Perto had a cousin...a female who was called Shoga (or something like that). I remember seeing her for the first and only time when I was child in the late 1960s. Shoga wore a gray cheongsam and had really small but stubby feet --pak-kha. Shoga was married to another Chinese in Jagna by the name of A-be Uy.

We never heard from our Oyong after he left the Philippines in 1948.  It is unfortunate that my Uncle Arsing never kept records or told older family members as to which village in Guangzhou he settled back in.

It would certainly be nice to hear from you, guys, in case we are related one way or the other because of our common Tan ancestry. Oyong and Oyang had 7 daughters and only 1 son. That is why very, very few in my family carried the Tan family name. The only Tan relations left in Tabajan, Guindulman are Maning Tan Tubig and his brother Elpidio. Other relatives in the area are the children and grandchildren of my late uncle, Ondoy Tan Fortich.

I will be going home to the Philippines in May and hope to attend the Tabajan fiesta on May 3rd. It would be nice to meet our Tan relatives :)

Ricky

Ricky,

I am planning to go back to Philippines in 2013. If you are going back then, please let us try to meet up to catch up and to record our words into paper so that we can trace our geneologies, which are distantly related. Regards.

I wish that my grandmother, the late Mrs. Fortunanta Tan-Salvo, was still alive because she would have been able to answer these questions that you have. And that I also have.

Thanks for your interest.

Best,
Lorenzo

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #27 on: September 04, 2012, 09:35:24 AM »

My ancestor [my great-grand-father], Tan Ngai He (Mariano Tan).
My Lolo Mariano was probably the 1st cousin of your Oyong Perto.

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #28 on: August 27, 2013, 11:10:33 PM »
Tan is the pinyin romanization of the Chinese surname .

In a 2006 study of the 100 most common Chinese surnames, Tan was found to be the 67th most common.

Lorenzo

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #29 on: August 27, 2013, 11:12:32 PM »
Romanisation and pronunciation


In Cantonese Chinese, it is romanised as Taam4 in Jyutping and Tàahm in Cantonese Yale. It is romanised as Tam in Hong Kong and Macao.

In Toisanese Chinese, it may be romanised as Tom, Thom, Hom, Ham or Hum.

In Hokkien Chinese, Teochew Chinese and Hainanese Chinese, it is romanised as Thâm.


Lorenzo

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #30 on: August 27, 2013, 11:16:10 PM »
The Origin of the Surname Tan





The surname came from the ancient State of Tan which was located in the western part of what is now Shandong Province. During the Spring and Autumn Period, this state was conquered by the neighbouring State of Qi. The court changed their surname to Tan in remembrance of their defeated homeland, and later prospered in Hunan Province.


For history lovers, the State of Tan existed  from 1046 till 684 BCE. Some 1000 years before the birth of Jesus Christ, the state of Tan was already an existing power in Imperial China.


Before Rome began as a civilization, the State of Tan was already there.

8)   

Ricky Caluen

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #31 on: June 16, 2016, 01:06:25 PM »
Hi, Lorenzo (and other Tan relatives). Kumusta na?

I just realized that it has been some 13 years since I last joined the discussion on the Tan family in Bohol. Now I am prompted to re-start conversation because my family is organizing the first-ever reunion of the descendants of my greatgrandfather--my "Oyong"--Tan Peco (a.k.a. Ruperto Tan-Roa, nicknamed by the residents of Tabajan, Guindulman "Insik Perto"). We hope for this to happen sometime in the summer of 2017.

To get the ball rolling, my immediate family invited some cousins from the Tan side to join the family reunion of Tan-Salise (that is, the family of my Lola Conching Tan and Lolo Jorge Salise, Sr, the latter of Valencia, Bohol). This took place just last May at Badiang Resort (Valencia).

The last surviving child of Rufina Bernaldez and Tan Peco, Rosario "Sayong" Tan-Tubig (Tabajan, Guindulman), passed away around 3 years ago at the age of 93. My Oyong had 11 children, however, only one child was a boy--Bartolome Tan, Sr. My Lolo Bartolome had 4 children two of which were boys. Of the two boys, Bartolome, Jr. has only one child, a girl. The other Tan boy was became a priest who later died. Thus, the Tan family name did not prosper in my branch of the family because the 10 daughters all got married and acquired married names.

I reviewed some of our exchange above where you noted that your greatgrandpa Tan Ngai was a first cousin of my Oyong. This is accurate because my Lola Conching was close to his children (your grandma and grand uncles, etc.). She referred to them as "mga pag-umangkon ni Papa". In the family history written by my Lolo Jorge he mentioned that my Oyong was responsible in bringing a few cousins to the Philippines just before the turn of the 20th century and these cousins settled in Leyte, Bohol, Sulu. Again, to recap, it was a cousin from Sulu who encouraged my Oyong to return to China on the eve of the communist revolution in 1949.

Some of my cousins had been asking me to locate the village where our Oyong came from. I told them I have no knowledge of this but that I recall you posting a picture of Tan Ngai (Mariano Tan) here in Tubag Bohol. I told my cousins I would take a look at this again to look at the place of birth of your greatgrandpa. So now I can tell my cousins most likely our Oyong was also from Guangzhou.

Just as an aside---you mentioned that your mother is a granddaughter of Ricardo Salise, Sr.? That makes me your uncle because your mama would be my second degree cousin:)). We also just concluded the grand reunion of the Salise clan of Poblacion Sur, Valencia (to distinguish from the Salise group of Anas) where the descendants of Lolo Ricardo (younger brother of my own Lolo Jorge) were possibly the largest representation. Kinsa diay imong Mama? I thought I had met all of Lolo Ricardo's children (first cousins of my mother Clarita). Kabilaan ang atong relationship :))

Additional trivia to Tan relations. My Oyong had another cousin who died many years ago in Jagna where she settled. She was called "Shoga". That doesn't sound like a Chinese name to me...sounds more like a title (not sure....I know the Chinese are fond of calling people according to their rank/status based on Confucian practice). Shoga married another Chinese: A-be Uy, also of Jagna. They were childless but adopted 3 children, one of whom was my uncle, Arsenio Tan-Roa, who I mentioned in an earlier posting.

If you happen to be in the Philippines in the summer of 2017 please join our Tan family reunion. Do you still have folks left behind in Valencia? I should very much like to meet them.

Cheers,

Ricky

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Re: Tan Ancestry
« Reply #32 on: December 11, 2016, 05:28:02 PM »

paging, lorenz! this is great. my own great grandpa is a tan from valencia. i suspect he's either the older brother or cousin of lorenz's great-great grandpa. my great grandpa's family name was changed to del bando, and that's how his descendants are now called.

one of my aunts married a salise. so there's a salise branch who are our relatives.
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