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Author Topic: PINTADOS  (Read 5945 times)

choi

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PINTADOS
« on: June 02, 2009, 01:04:07 AM »
Kamusta Ninjong Tanan!  :)
So I learned a long time ago that the early Boholano's were once called, "Pintados" by the Spaniards, which means the tattooed ones. I have seen a few pics/painting of a Pintado and I admit, these tats look pretty darn amazing. But there has always been one one thing I always wanted to know, and that is What do the tattoos mean and what does each symbol or marking symobolize???  ???

so everyone ..plz share your knowledge and I hope we can learn something new 2day!  ;D ;D ;D salamat!
proud bol-anon! taga calape. :)

Koddi Prudente

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #1 on: June 02, 2009, 08:25:50 AM »
Actually, the whole Visayas (now divided into Eastern, Central and Western) was called "Las Islas de Los Pintados" (Islands of Painted People) by the early Spanish colonizers. Long time ago I saw pictures of painted women from Capiz on a book.  Can't recall the details, though, but I remember they were mostly zigzag patterns on the arms and legs, similar to the zigzag patterns of early clay pottery.   

bolingitboy

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #2 on: June 04, 2009, 05:58:22 AM »
this is an interesting thread... i have been looking for information with regards to the appearance of pre-hispanic filipinos and what body adornments they used including the use of tattoos among men and women. according to information i found in the net, early filipino men in the visayas (it did not mention which part, which province in particular) wore their hair long and was tied in a bun. they wore either sleeveless or short sleeved jacket which was open in the front, and wore a g-string. they wore a headress of different colors which indicated their status in the community. as jewelry, men wore earrings, necklace, rings, armlets and anklets. women had long hair which was left flowing naturally behind their back, and wore sleeved jackets and skirts. for ornaments, they wore earrings, necklace rings and bracelets. both men and women, however, were heavily tattooed although men had more of their bodies covered with ink compared to women. men were practically covered with designs including the face, body and extremities while women had tattooes only on the extremities; none on the face and body.

you guys, choi and koddi are lucky to have seen pictures of how these tattoos look like; i have not. can any of you please post a pic of these supposedly pre-spanish filipino tattoo design in this thread? hopefully someone will be able to tell us what these images or designs mean.

interestingly, in comparison to the description of early visayans, the same information source describes the tagalogs as different in his appearance. tagalog men reportedly wore their hair short and their bodies were rid of any tattoos.

Koddi Prudente

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #3 on: June 04, 2009, 07:19:07 AM »
Another account by an American engineer, Paul Scriven, may give us an idea of how the Boholanos looked at the turn of the century.  In particular, he described the natives as better looking than the rest of the Visayans. Search for Paul Scriven: Diary of an American in Bohol circa 1900s.

choi

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2009, 05:11:11 PM »
here are a couple pics of the Pintados....





proud bol-anon! taga calape. :)

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #4 on: June 05, 2009, 05:11:11 PM »

fdaray

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #5 on: June 05, 2009, 07:14:55 PM »
The Pintados-Kasadyaan Festival is a merry-making event lasting a whole month, highlights of which include the Leyte Kasadyaan Festival of Festivals, the 17th Pintados Festival Ritual Dance Presentation and the "Pagrayhak'' Grand Parade. These festivals are said to have began from the feast day of Señor Santo Niño, held every June 29th. The Leyteños celebrate a religious festival in a unique and colorful way. Since the Visayans are experienced in the art of body tattooing, men and women are fond of tattooing themselves.

The Pintados Festival displays the rich cultural heritage, incorporating native music and dances, of the people of Leyte and Samar. The Leyte Kasadya-an Festival of Festivals, meanwhile, showcases the unique culture and colorful history of the Province of Leyte. Started by former Leyte Governor Remedios Loreto-Petilla, the celebration was first held on May 12, 1996. The festivities weren't always held every June 29th; the first three years saw different dates. It was only in 1999 that it was fixed to June 29, the Feast of the Señor Santo Niño de Leyte.

"Kasadyaan'' in the Visayan tongue means merriment and jollity. Various municipal festivals of Leyte gather together in the original capital of Tacloban City for the celebration. There, lively dance-drama parade of many colors takes place. There is an important role that the festival plays, and it is strengthening the Leyteños' sense of pride. Every municipality mounts a storyline all their own to portray with pride their local folklore and legends.


The Festival

The Pintados festival of Tacloban City is a Filipino festival with its own unique flavor. This Pintados festival recalls Pre-Spanish history of the native Leytenos from wars, epics and folk religions. The most expected aspect of the Pintados festival are the festive dancers, painted from head to toe with designs that look like armor to resemble the tattooed warriors of old. During the course of the Pintados festival, dancers whose bodies are painted in an amazing array of colors fill the streets of Tacloban city. At first sight, they may seem outrageous as grown men pour into the streets decorated in such dazzling colors as luminous blue or neon green. But as one gets used to this and sees the dances depicted, one gets a glimpse of the history of the people that once lived on the islands of Leyte so long ago.

The folk dances presented by the dancers portray the many traditions that flourished before the Spaniards came. These include worship of idols, indigenous music and epic stories. The hypnotic rhythms of native instruments beat through the air accompanying the dances performed on the streets as the Pintados festival goes. Aside from the folk dances, is the much likely parade, which crisscrosses the avenues of Tacloban city. The parade traditionally begins at the Balayuan Towers and proceeds throughout tacloban leyte city. The surprised spectators follow the procession of dancing colors from the beginning to end. The Pintados festival concludes in much merrymaking with a signature traditional Filipino fiesta, where everyone is invited to join the fun and celebrate the Pintados Festival.


History

In 1668, the Spaniards came to the Visayas and found in the islands heavily tattooed men and women, whom they called Pintados. These people had a culture of their own, commemorating victories by holding festivals and honoring their gods after a bountiful harvest.

It was in 1888 that missionaries from Spain brought the Child Jesus image known as "El Capitan" to the island. It had a rich and colorful background that draw out the devotion and worship of the Leyte natives to the Santo Niño.

Then in 1986, the Pintados Foundation, Inc. was founded by civic-minded businessmen and entrepreneurs based in Tacloban City. They began organizing religious cultural activities for the city fiesta in honor of Señor Santo Niño. This marked the advent of the Pintados Festival, which was first celebrated June 29th of the year 1987. Today, it is called the Leyte Pintados-Kasadyaan Festival and is called as the "Festival of Festivals."

The name “pintados” is derived from what the native warriors, whose bodies were adorned with tattoos, were called. In those times, and even in some places today, tattoos were a mark of courage and beauty. Since tattoo-making was not yet as precise as it is today, they were rather painful and one risked the chance of contracting an infection. Therefore, a man who faced the dangers of tattooing and lived was considered to be both strong and brave. But even before the tattoo process itself, one would have to earn them after fighting heroically in wars.

Tattoos (pintados) served as a status symbol; much like a general’s badge would today. It was the mark of courage, rank and strength. The bravest warriors were heavily adorned in tattoos which covered every inch of their bodies, head to foot. Indeed, these men were in fact such an unusual sight that western missionaries considered them frightening and uncivilized upon their first glimpses of these warriors. But as time passed, they learned to see the tattoos as a part of the life of native peoples and even as a sign of beauty for them. With the passing of time, as the story is with all things, the old made way for the new. The traditions of tattooing (pintados) and worshiping earth spirits were replaced as modernization came. But these traditions are still remembered with the celebration of the Pintados festival.

This Pintados festival helps us to see the worth and beauty of the traditions of the country’s ancestors. It gives us the opportunity to feel a rare first-hand experience, the experience of culture

fdaray

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #6 on: June 05, 2009, 07:18:21 PM »


Pintados Festival in the Visayas Region.

chicogon

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #7 on: June 05, 2009, 10:29:28 PM »
If the whole of Visayas were supposed to be called "Islas de los Pintados" would that mean that we lost a beautiful heritage because we went instead for something more popular and specifically Bol-anon, i.e., Sandugo, instead of something that was common to the region? Just asking... Sandugo Festival itself wasn't always celebrated until the mid 90's.
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Koddi Prudente

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #8 on: June 06, 2009, 12:37:25 AM »
here are a couple pics of the Pintados....








Da, lagi. Nakahinumdum pa jud diay ko nga zigzag ang pattern sa mga tattoos.

bolingitboy

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #9 on: June 08, 2009, 07:43:35 AM »
choi: thanks for the pics. if you get your hands on more of these, please pass them along :-)

koddi: thanks fof the link info.

Mr. daray: thanks for the additional info.

Koddi Prudente

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #10 on: June 08, 2009, 07:57:38 AM »
If the whole of Visayas were supposed to be called "Islas de los Pintados" would that mean that we lost a beautiful heritage because we went instead for something more popular and specifically Bol-anon, i.e., Sandugo, instead of something that was common to the region? Just asking... Sandugo Festival itself wasn't always celebrated until the mid 90's.

You are correct, Chic.

bolingitboy

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #11 on: June 08, 2009, 08:13:43 AM »
"If the whole of Visayas were supposed to be called "Islas de los Pintados" would that mean that we lost a beautiful heritage because we went instead for something more popular and specifically Bol-anon, i.e., Sandugo, instead of something that was common to the region? Just asking... Sandugo Festival itself wasn't always celebrated until the mid 90's."

this comment may have a point here... the sandugo festival in bohol is a product of a marketing scheme devised by the DOT back in the late 80s to create a festival every month in different provinces of the philippines. there is no historical significance whatsoever in holding the sandugo festival in july; it was simply the month that was assigned by the DOT for bohol to hold it.

Koddi Prudente

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #12 on: June 08, 2009, 08:49:58 AM »
There was a very extensive debate why Leyte used the term Pintados, which is not exclusive to the province. The festival's name has evolved, though. Gibutangan na og complete name, Leyte Pintados Kasadyan, unless ginganlan sa sab og lain. 

bolingitboy

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #13 on: June 12, 2009, 07:18:42 AM »
"There was a very extensive debate why Leyte used the term Pintados, which is not exclusive to the province. The festival's name has evolved, though. Gibutangan na og complete name, Leyte Pintados Kasadyan, unless ginganlan sa sab og lain."

this is quite interesting, the use of the term pintados in leyte. in school, i have always been taught in my history class that the term pintados was used by a spanish chronicler who first made a description of the natives that he had seen in the island of panay who were heavily tattooed. in other words, the term pintados has always been known to be associated with panay, although panay is not necessarily the entire visayas but only a part of it. if i'm not mistaken it was the expedition of miguel lopez de legazpi who first landed in panay island on their way to manila to establish a fort there. this was around 1568-1569, a year or so after they established a garrison in the shoreline of cebu city which is now called fort san pedro.


choi

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #14 on: June 12, 2009, 11:10:15 AM »
here is some cool information, I read it off a book I found online called Barangay:16th Century, by William Henry Scott. it says here :

"All royal datus who had dealings with Spanish commanders were clothed only in tattoos and G-Strings---Kolambu of Limasawa, Awi of Butuan, KATUNA of BOHOL, and Tupas of Cebu."


I was somewhat surprised to see Datu Sikatuna as one of the great Datu's to adorn these tattoos. This is great evidence that the tattoo traditions did reach Bohol.
proud bol-anon! taga calape. :)

bolingitboy

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Re: PINTADOS
« Reply #15 on: June 14, 2009, 05:16:36 AM »
"All royal datus who had dealings with Spanish commanders were clothed only in tattoos and G-Strings---Kolambu of Limasawa, Awi of Butuan, KATUNA of BOHOL, and Tupas of Cebu."


I was somewhat surprised to see Datu Sikatuna as one of the great Datu's to adorn these tattoos. This is great evidence that the tattoo traditions did reach Bohol."

from the readings i had so far on pre-spanish filipinos particularly visayans and the use of tattoos based on limited materials and literatures, i have always suspected that the natives the spaniards found in places that they visited such as leyte, bohol and cebu sported these tattoos. the info you got from the book you mentioned only confirms my suspicions. i hope to find a more detailed illustration of these tattoos and what they patterns symbolize.

 


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